The History of Animation

Timeline created by alexis818
  • THAUMATROPE

    THAUMATROPE
    The thaumatrope housed a rotating mechanism with a different picture on each side.
    When rotated, you saw a combined picture (known as persistence of vision).
    http://history-of-animation.webflow.io/
  • PHENAKITOSCOPE

    The zoetrope was a hollow drum that housed images on long interchangeable
    strips that spin and made the images appear to move.
    http://history-of-animation.webflow.io/
  • ZOETROPE

    ZOETROPE
    The zoetrope was a hollow drum that housed images on long interchangeable
    strips that spin and made the images appear to move. http://history-of-animation.webflow.io/
  • FLIP-BOOK

    FLIP-BOOK
    The flip-book, also known as the kineograph, reached a wide audience and is credited
    with inspiring early animators more than the machines developed in this era.
    http://history-of-animation.webflow.io/
  • MOVIEOLA/PRAXINOSCOPE

    MOVIEOLA/PRAXINOSCOPE
    The praxinoscope expanded on the zoetrope, using multiple wheels to rotate images.
    It is considered to have shown the first prototypes of the animated cartoon. http://history-of-animation.webflow.io/
  • 1914: A PREHISTORIC DINOSAUR LEADS THE WAVE OF THE FUTURE

    1914: A PREHISTORIC DINOSAUR LEADS THE WAVE OF THE FUTURE
    In the early 20th century, theaters were already showing animated films on the big screen, but the characters were usually no more than spokesdrawings for various advertisers. Until Winsor McCay a legendary cartoonist created the groundbreaking film Gertie the Dinosaur.McCay was often called "The Father of American Cartoons." http://mentalfloss.com/article/17945/10-landmark-moments-animation-history
  • 1920S: CHARLES LINDBERGH AND THE QUEEN FALL FOR THE SAME CAT

    1920S: CHARLES LINDBERGH AND THE QUEEN FALL FOR THE SAME CAT
    Because live-action films were such a big hit with moviegoers, early cartoon characters were often modeled on popular actors of the day. One such cartoon character was Master Tom—a black feline with enormous eyes and an inviting ear-to-ear grin. His creator, legendary animator Otto Messmer, based the cat's personality on silent-film star Charlie Chaplin. Fitting because, within a year, a slightly boxier version of the cat, now named Felix, started appearing regularly in animated short films.
  • 1928: WHEN THE MOUSE SPEAKS, PEOPLE LISTEN

    1928: WHEN THE MOUSE SPEAKS, PEOPLE LISTEN
    While Disney's animation house floated by for a while, it wasn't until Walt made his first "talkie" that America truly started buzzing about him. 1928's Steamboat Willie signaled the end of the silent-film era. Disney had followed engineers' experiments with sound and film throughout the 1920s, and he was convinced talkies were the future.
    http://mentalfloss.com/article/17945/10-landmark-moments-animation-history
  • 1930: BETTY BOOP GETS SEXED UP

    1930: BETTY BOOP GETS SEXED UP
    During the early days of animation, Disney's studio wasn't the only one having trouble defining its characters' personalities. Max Fleischer (creator of Popeye) also had a giant hit on his hands with the seductive, garter-wearing flapper Betty Boop. http://mentalfloss.com/article/17945/10-landmark-moments-animation-history
  • 1933: TOONS GET LOONEY

     1933: TOONS GET LOONEY
    Four of the most original and creative artists ever to come along—Tex Avery, Chuck Jones, Friz Freling, and Robert McKimson—had a different philosophy when it came to their animated creations: the zanier, the better. As the minds behind such classic characters as Daffy Duck, the Tasmanian Devil, Elmer Fudd, and Bugs Bunny, the animators made sure their stars ran wild, shouted at the top of their lungs, and killed, maimed, blew up, slugged, shot, and destroyed their foes.