2017 Keiryn Sandahl Dalat World History

Timeline created by QueenTsunami7
In History
  • 3,500 BCE

    3.1, Mesopotamia, Food Surplus!

    Food surplus allowed division of labor, which caused the first cities to develop. City-states were created. A city-state is a combination of a rural and an urban area.
  • 3,100 BCE

    4.1, Ancient Egypt, The First Pharaoh

    Menes unified Egypt and became the first pharaoh. He wore a double crown to show he is king of upper and lower Egypt.
  • 2,700 BCE

    4.2, The Old Kingdom, Mummification

    The Egyptians developed a system for preserving their dead called mummification.
  • 2,500 BCE

    4.2, Old Kingdom, The Pyramids

    The pyramids were tombs for the pharaohs. They are triangle-shaped. The Great Pyramid was built by Khufu.
  • 2,334 BCE

    3.2, Mesopotamia, The Akkadian Empire

    The people of Sumer who lived in city-states were always arguing with each other. So Sargon and the Akkadians came and conquered them. Sargon managed to conquer most of the Fertile Crescent, uniting its people under his rule and creating the first empire.
  • 2,000 BCE

    5.1, India, Harappan civilization

    In ancient India, the Harappans developed a civilization known as the Harappan civilization. They had a central government and well-planned cities with straight streets that intersected at right angles. They use carved stamps called seals when trading goods.
  • 1,800 BCE

    3.3, Sumer, The First Writing

    Sumerians developed the first writing system, called cuneiform. Following the creation of cuneiform, the Sumerians created epics, or long poems telling stories about ancient heroes.
  • 1,500 BCE

    6.1, China, The Shang Dynasy

    The Shang dynasty was the second Chinese dynasty. They developed a writing system.
  • 1,200 BCE

    4.3, The New Kingdom, Ramses the Great

    Ramses the Great was Egypt's last great pharaoh. He built many monuments including the Temple of Karnak.
  • 1,200 BCE

    4.4, Egypt, The Temple of Karnak

    The Temple of Karnak was created by Ramses the Great. Egyptians believed it was home to the gods.
  • 1,200 BCE

    7.1, Egypt, The Exodus

    The Jews lived in slavery to the Egyptians for many years. They prayed that God would free them, and eventually, God sent Moses. Moses was a Hebrew baby who grew up a prince. He encountered a burning bush, and God told him to tell Pharaoh to free the Jews. After ten plagues, Pharaoh did, and this event is known as the exodus.
  • 1,100 BCE

    6.2, China, The Mandate of Heaven

    The mandate of heaven is what gave kings the power to rule. If something bad happened during that king's rule, he didn't have the mandate of heaven anymore. Another king would be found.
  • 1,000 BCE

    5.2, Arayan India, The caste system

    The Aryans created the caste system. It determined your occupation based on your birth and wealth. The highest caste were the Brahmins, who were the priests. Then were the Kshatriyas, who were kings and warriors. The Vasyas were farmers, merchants, and craftsmen, and the Sudras were the lowest caste, the servants. The untouchables were considered so low they were without a caste.
  • -900 BCE

    8.1, Greece, The Classical Age

    The Classical Age in Greece was when Ancient Greece was at its height of achievement. They had city-states, acropolises, and agoras.
  • -800 BCE

    3.4, Phoenicia, The first alphabet

    Along the Mediterranean Sea, the Phoenicians developed a trading society. Since they had no ruler of their own, they were ruled by other kingdoms. They also developed purple fabric, grew cedar trees, and created the first alphabet.
  • -800 BCE

    8.3, Greece, Homer

    Homer was an author of epic poetry. We do not know much about him, only his works. These include the Odyssey and the Iliad. He wrote about the Trojan War.
  • -753 BCE

    10.1, the Italian Peninsula, Rome is Founded

    Legend says Rome was founded by twin brothers named Romulus and Remus, who were raised by wolves. When they built their city, they had an argument over what it should be called. Romulus then killed his brother and named the city after himself.
  • -751 BCE

    4.5, Kush, The conquest of Egypt

    Kush grew stronger and Egypt grew weaker. A Kushite King named Kashta attacked, and Kush conquered Egypt.
  • -563 BCE

    5.3, India, The Buddha

    A wealthy prince named Siddhartha Gautama left his home to learn how to stop suffering. He received enlightenment under a tree and became the Buddha. He taught the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path.
  • -551 BCE

    6.2, China, Confucius

    Confucius was a Chinese scholar who believed that the way to have peace was through education and moral values.
  • -546 BCE

    8.2, Athens, Tyranny

    In Athens, they were ruled by an oligarchy, a few aristocrats who had all the power. But one man, Peisistratus, overthrew the oligarchy and became the first tyrant, or a strong leader who has power.
  • -540 BCE

    9.1, Persia, Cyrus the Great

    Cyrus the Great was the founder of the Persian Empire. The people he conquered were allowed to keep their own customs, however. Cyrus has a very effective army, consisting of the Immortals, 10,000 of his best soldiers, and a cavalry, or warriors mounted on horses, among other things.
  • -450 BCE

    10.2, Rome, the Twelve Tables

    At first, only the patricians knew Rome’s laws and I forced them. But the Plebeians wanted to know what the laws were so they could avoid breaking them. So the officials of Rome wrote down a set of laws on 12 bronze tablets called the Twelve Tables.
  • -431 BCE

    9.2, Greece, the Peloponnesian War

    Athens became more and more powerful. They started controlling other city-states through the Delian League. Eventually, Sparta and its allies grew tired of this. They fought Athens in a long war for power. In the end, Sparta won.
  • -400 BCE

    9.4, Athens, the Parthenon

    The Parthenon is a temple in Athens. It was built to honor Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom. The Parthenon is an example of the Greeks’ great architectural achievements, such as columns.
  • -334 BCE

    9.3, Greece, Alexander the Great

    Alexander the Great conquered much of Asia and Europe. He was the son of King Phillip II and built his empire at a very young age. He also never lost a battle. A part of his army was a phalanx, which is a formation of soldiers with long spears.
  • -270 BCE

    5.4, The Mauryan Empire, Ashoka

    Ashoka was the emperor of the Mauryan empire when it was at its height. He fought many battles and conquered much of India. During the Battle of Kalinga, he saw much suffering and converted to Buddhism. He created many Buddhist monuments all over India.
  • -221 BCE

    6.3, China, Burning books

    In China, a new Legalistic emperor, Shi Huangdi, came into power. He ordered scholars to burn the books that did not agree with his opinions.
  • -206 BCE

    6.4, China, Liu Bang Creates a New Dynasty

    Liu Bang was a pheasant who became an emperor. He started the Han Dynasty, which lasted for 400 years. He was able to do this through the mandate of heaven.
  • -202 BCE

    10.3, Carthage, the Battle of Zama

    In a city called Carthage in North Africa, a leader called Hannibal rose to power. Hannibal hated Rome, and he led an attack against Rome by going over the Alps and into Rome from the north. His army contained war elephants. Then a Roman leader named Scipio led an attack on Carthage itself, and defeated Hannibal at the Battle of Zama.
  • -27 BCE

    11.1, Rome, the First Roman Emperor

    After Julius Caesar died, Octavian seized power. He fought Marc Antony, and soon became the emperor of Rome. The senate called him ‘Augustus’, meaning ‘Revered One’.
  • -1 BCE

    11.2, Bethelehem, the Birth of Jesus

    A virgin named Mary was visited by an angel, who said she would have a baby. Later, a census came to pass, and she and Joseph went to Bethlehem. While they were there, the baby was born in a stable. He was laid in a manger, and named Jesus.
  • 30

    11.2, Jerusalem, the Death of Jesus

    Jesus preached about the Kingdom of God to the people of Israel. The religious leaders looked upon him as their enemy, and got him arrested. He was nailed to a cross to die, but rose from the dead three days later.
  • 66

    7.3, Jerusalem, The First Revolt

    The Jews in Jerusalem revolted against Roman rule. Near the end of the revolt, the Jews secured themselves in a fortress cslled Masada. Eventually, they lost. During the revolt, the Second Temple was destroyed, and many were Jews killed.
  • 160

    4.5, Kush, Queen Shanakhdakheto

    She was the first queen of Kush. Kush had several women rulers, queens were more important than in Egypt.
  • 200

    6.5, China and Rome, The Silk Road

    The Silk Road was a trade route from Rome to China. The Chinese traded silk, jade, and spices with Rome and the Romans traded amber, gold, and wool with China.
  • 300

    11.2, Rome, Constantine Makes Christianity Rome’s Religion

    Constantine was an emperor who became a Christian. He stopped the persecution of Christians, and made Christianity Rome’s official religion.
  • 320

    5.4, The Gupta Empire, Promotion of Hinduism

    When the Gupta Empire came to power, they promoted Hinduism as India's main religion.
  • 476

    11.3, Rome, the Fall of Rome

    Rome began to weaken, from both outside attacks and unrest on the inside. TheGoths managed to attack and destroy the city of Rome itself. Diocletian decided that Rome had too much land to protect, so he split it into the Eastern and Western Roman Empires. The Western Empire, however, soon fell invaders.
  • 570

    12.1, Mecca, Muhammad is born

    In a city called Mecca on the Arabian Peninsula, Muhammad was born. He would later start a world religion known as Islam.
  • 632

    12.2, Mecca and Medina, the Qur’an

    The Qur’an is the Islamic holy book. It is a collection of Muhammad’s words and teachings, put together after his death.
  • 1526

    12.3, India, the Mughal Empire is established

    A man named Babur led the Mughals, who were Turkish Muslims, from Central Asia into India . Here he founded an empire, known as the Mughal Empire.
  • 12.4, Muslim Empires, Medical Encyclopedia

    An Islamic doctor named Avicenna wrote a medical encyclopedia. It was one of the most famous medical books of the his time and for some time afterwards.
  • 7.2, Judea, The Dead Sea Scrolls

    The Dead Sea Scrolls were written by the Jews several thousand years ago. They were commentaries and prayers about the Jewish beliefs. They were discovered in 1947.
  • Ch. 3, Modern Day, Hammurabi's Code

    Hammurabi's Code was the first system of laws. Today, we also have laws. While our laws are not so severe as in ancient times, they share similarities with Hammurabi's Code.
  • Ch. 4, Modern Day, Papyrus

    The Egyptians were the first to make a paper like material. We still use paper today, inspired by the Egyptian invention.
  • Ch. 5, Modern day, Inaculation

    Inaculation is the act of injecting someone with a certain disease to help your body combat it. People still have injections today.
  • Ch. 6, Modern day, Silk

    Silk is still produced today. It is an important Chinese export.
  • Ch. 7, Modern Day, Passover

    The Jews still celebrate Passover today. Passover is a remembrance of the tenth plague and the Exodus.
  • Ch. 8, Modern Day, Democracy

    Democracy is a form of government first created in Athens by Cleisthenes. Democracy means 'Rule by the people'. Democracy allows citizens to vote, and not just one person has power. Many countries today are democracies. They are different from Athens because Athens is a direct democracy where everyone actively votes, and most modern day democracies are representative democracies where you elect someone to vote for you.
  • Ch. 9, Modern Day, Euclid

    Euclid was a Greek mathematician who lived in Alexandria. He made many discoveries in the field of geometry. There is a branch of geometry today called Euclidean geometry.
  • Ch. 10, Modern Day, the Roman Government

    Rome’s government helped it be an ancient power. It had checks and balances so one leader could not have all the power. Today, many countries have similar forms of government, including the US, which has a tripartite government just like Rome.
  • Ch. 11, Modern Day, Christianity

    Christianity started in Roman times, and is a world wide religion today.
  • Ch. 12, Modern Day, Arabic Numerals

    The Muslims invented the numbers we use today. That’s why they are called ‘Arabic Numerals’.
  • Period:
    10,000 BCE
    to
    -800 BCE

    Ch. 3- Early Fertile Crescent People

    Thousands of years ago, the hunter-gatherers settle to be farmers, creating the first civilization!!!!!!!
    Important people groups:
    Sumerians
    Akkadians
    Babylonians
    Hittites
    Kassites
    Assyrians
    Chaldeans
    Phoenicians
  • Period:
    3,100 BCE
    to
    350

    Ch. 4- Egypt and Kush

    Ancient Egypt: 3100 BC to 2700 BC
    Old Kingdom: 2700 BC to 2200 BC
    Middle Kingdom: 2050 BC to 1750 BC
    New Kingdom: 1550 BC to 1050 BC
  • Period:
    2,300 BCE
    to
    500

    Ch. 5- Ancient India

    Many civilizations rose and fell in India.
    It was where the civilizations of Harappa, the Aryan civilization, and the Mauryan and Gupta empires where located.
  • Period:
    2,200 BCE
    to
    200

    Ch. 6- Ancient China

    In ancient China, there were many great dynasties such as the Xia, Shang, Zhou, Qin, and Han.
  • Period:
    2,000 BCE
    to

    Ch. 7- The Hebrews and Judaism

    The Hebrews were a group of people who followed God. They had a set of laws given to them by God. Later, they were given their own kingdom.
  • Period:
    2,000 BCE
    to
    -429 BCE

    Ch. 8- Ancient Greece

    On a peninsula in the Mediterranean Sea, a new civilization arose. Greece was home to many poets, and developed many myths, fables, and epics.
  • Period:
    -753 BCE
    to
    -120 BCE

    Ch. 10- The Roman Republic

    On the Italian peninsula, a city called Rome was founded. At first it was a monarchy, but then the Romans changed the government to a republic.
  • Period:
    -559 BCE
    to
    -323 BCE

    Ch. 9- The Greek World

    Greece developed many city-states and a complex culture. Two city-states in particular, Athens and Sparta, became very powerful.
  • Period:
    -70 BCE
    to
    1453

    Ch. 11- Rome and Christianity

    As Rome turned from a republic into an empire, a new religion called Christianity was born. It would be both persecuted and favored by the government of Rome.
  • Period:
    570
    to

    Ch. 12- The Islamic World

    Islam was a new religion started in the city of Mecca by a man named Muhammad. Later, three empires rose from Islam, the Ottoman Empire , the Safavid Empire, and the Mughal Empire.