The history of Computing

Timeline created by efc5034
  • Fist-generation computer

    The first generation computers were huge, slow, expensive, and often undependable.
  • First-generation computers

    Two Americans Presper Eckert and John Mauchly built the ENIAC electronic computer.
  • First-generation computers

    First-generation computers
    ENIAC, the prototype first-generation computers, contained about 18,000 tubes, and every tube was replaced atleast once in the first year of operation.
  • First-generation computers

    The first generation computers were huge, slow, expensive, and often undependable.
  • Second-generation computers

    First demonstrated by At&T's Bell labratories, transitors regulate current or voltage flow and act as a switch for electronic signals.
  • Second-generation computers

    One transistor replaced the equivalent of 40 vacuum tubes.
  • First-generation computers

    They consume a lot of power, much of which is wasted heat. They also tend to burn out quickly.
  • First-generation computers

    As the computer era dawned, programmers were were forst to think in 1's and 0's to write instructions in machine language.
  • Third-generation computers

    Jack Kilby at Texas instrumementsand Robert Noyce at Fairchild Semiconductor independently developed integrated circuits.
  • Third-generation computers

    Two of the first computers to incorparate integrated circuits were the RCA Spetra 70 and the widely successful IBM 360.
  • Second-generation computers

    By the late 1950's, transitors,had replaced vacuume tubes as the processing and memory technology for most computers.
  • Second-generation computers

    Second-generation computers
    these computers use transitors instead of instead of vacume tubes.
  • Second-generation computers

    Computer manufactures such as IBM developed operating systems that provided standardized routines for input,output,memory management,storage and other resouce managemnt activities.
  • Second-generation computers

    These computers ran programming language compliers that allowed programmers to write instructions using english-like commands rather then machine language.
  • Third-generation computers

    In 1965, Digital equipment corp. (DEC) introduced the DEC PDP-8, the first comercially successful minicomputer.
  • Third-generation computers

    Third-generation computers
    Thousands of manufactoring plants,small buisnesses, and scientific laboratorieswere attracted to the speed,small size,and reasonable cost of the PDP-8.
  • Third-generation computers

    DEC introduced a succession of minicomputers that stole a share of the main frame market.
  • Fourth-generation computers

    The technology of fourth-generation computers appeared when Ted Hoff developed the first general-purpose microprocessor.
  • Fourth-generation computers

    Motorola released the 6800 8-bit microprocessor.
  • Fourth generation computers

    Fourth generation computers
    The Altair computer made the cover of popular electronics in January 1975.
  • Fourth-generation computers

    Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak founded Apple computercorporation and released the Apple I.
  • Fouth-generation computer

    Zilog introduced the Z80 microprocessor, an enchanced 8080microprocessor that was used in many early computer systems.
  • Fourth-generation computers

    IBM began marketing what is called a personal computer or PC. Based on the 8088 processor.
  • Fourth-generation computers

    Apple introduced a product called Apple Lisa.
  • Fourth-generation computers

    By putting millions of transistors onto one single chip more calculation and faster speeds could be reached by computers. Because electricity travels about a foot in a billionth of a second, the smaller the distance the greater the speed of computers.