The Road to Special Education

Timeline created by amberj_21
  • Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka

    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka
    Brown v. Board of Education was a court case that eliminated segregation in the schools. "Separate but equal" as overturned and public schools were integrated. I chose this event because it formed the foundation for future rulings that children with disabilities cannot be excluded from school, which makes it a very significant piece of history that led to special education.
  • President's Committee on Mental Retardation

    President's Committee on Mental Retardation
    President John F. Kennedy had a sister with mental retardation, which made him feel very strongly about the progression towards special education. He created the committee to discover new ways in which the federal government could continue to meet the needs of the diverse population. More information below.
    JFK and People with Intellectual Disabilities
  • Elementary and Secondary Education Amendments (ESEA)

    Elementary and Secondary Education Amendments (ESEA)
    The ESEA of 1965 authorized the first state-level grand program that was made specifically for children and young adults with disabilties. In 1967, the ESEA established the Bureau of the Handicapped in order to administer specific funds towards research and education, as well as training in special education.
  • Mills v. Board of Education of the District of Columbia

    Mills v. Board of Education of the District of Columbia
    When seven children with disabilities of different sorts were denied admission to school with no alternative form of education provided to them, this court case came about. This court case gave these students free public education or an alternative that met their needs. I chose this court case because it recognized all students with disabilities and opened up free public education for all of them.
  • Section 504

    Section 504
    Section 504 stated that nobody with any form of disability could be denied access to or benefits from any program that was receiving federal financial assitance. I chose this event because its importance comes from its guaruntee for basic civil rights for people with disabilities and it required accommodations in schools, as well as in society.
  • The Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EAHCA)

    The Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EAHCA)
    The EAHCA mandated that students with disabilities have access to appropriate, free education in public schools and they should be included in the least restrictive environment. They also cannot be excluded from services provided by the educational system because of their disability. I chose this event because it had many standards that needed to be met for all students with disabilities, including a clear statement of what is to be provided to each student and how it will be provided.
  • Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

    Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
    EAHCA was renamed IDEA in 1990. IDEA mandated transition programs for students beginning by the age of 16 for special educaation. It made autism and traumatic brain injuries specific categories on the special education spectrum and it strengthed the least restrictive environment requirements for special education, as well. I chose this event because IDEA is what guides the specialized instruction, IEPs, and the general process for special education, which makes it very significant.
  • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

    Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
    ADA made minimum the discrimination in employment, transportation, and other public accommodations. As it pertains to education, school design and physical accessilbility must be taken into great account to make sure that all students have adequate access to the environment. Also, students must be educated in the most integrated setting possible. I chose this because it is very prominent in any setting today, as people must have access to a wide variety of places regardless of disability.
  • Olmstead v. L.C.

    Olmstead v. L.C.
    Two women with cognitive and psychosocial disabilities sued under ADA in order to be able to live a community in which they can receive their services. Similar to students being educated in the least restrictive environment, this court case ruled that states must administer their assistance and services in the most integrated setting possible to meet the needs of the individual. I chose this because, similar to education, people are now aloud to live within society regardless of disibility.
  • No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB)

    No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB)
    NCLB was the reauthorization of ESEA. It began requiring all students to participate and a variety of standardized testing at the state and district level. It also called for 100% proficiency of all students in reading and math by 2012. I chose this piece of legislation because it shows how far special education has come over time and how the requirements have heightened overtime. More information on NCLB is in the link.
    No Child Left Behind