THE HISTORY OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY

Timeline created by asoş
In History
  • 30,000 BCE

    CAVE DRAWINGS

    CAVE DRAWINGS
    Cave drawing was one of the first ways of using educational technology that appeared before the history. They have been made since Upper Paleolithic. Europe, Africa, Australia and Southeast Asia are main countries to be found the cave drawings. It is widely believed that the paintings are the work of respected elders or shamans. Large wild animals, such as bison, horses, aurochs, and deer, and tracings of human hands are the most common themes in European as well as abstract patterns.
  • 105

    PAPER MADE IN CHINA

    PAPER MADE IN CHINA
    Paper was the most significant invention of China and it changed the world. It was discovered around 100 CE. The first paper was made from rags, but later plant materials were used, such as bark, hemp, and bamboo. The invention spread slowly across the world, reaching Europe in the 1100s.
  • PUBLIC EDUCATION

    PUBLIC EDUCATION
    In the South, public schools were not common during the 1600s and the early 1700s. Affluent families paid private tutors to educate their children.These schools educated students of all ages in one room with one teacher. Students did not attend these schools for free. Parents paid tuition, provided housing for the school teacher, or contributed other commodities in exchange for their children being allowed to attend the school.
  • HORN-BOOK

    HORN-BOOK
    A hornbook is a book that serves as primer for study. The hornbook originated in England as long ago as 1450,or earlier. The term has been applied to a few different study materials in different fields. In children's education, in the years before modern educational materials were used, it referred to a leaf or page displaying the alphabet, religious materials, etc., covered with a transparent sheet of horn (or mica) and attached to a frame provided with a handle.
  • PUBLIC EDUCATION: SCHOOL SLATE AND CHALKBOARD

    PUBLIC EDUCATION: SCHOOL  SLATE AND CHALKBOARD
    In use for 100 years, the school slate helped students work and rework problems, it is larger cousin, the chalkboard, is still used in classrooms today.
  • AUDIOVISUAL AGE: FILM PROJECTOR

    AUDIOVISUAL AGE: FILM PROJECTOR
    Thomas Edison claimed that the film projector would soon render books obsolete in schools: "Scholars will soon be instructed through the eye."
  • INFORMATION AGE: TELEVISION

    INFORMATION AGE: TELEVISION
    The use of film for classroom instruction became obsolete with the arrival of television set.
  • COMPUTER AGE

    COMPUTER AGE
    The two major functions of education are to transmit the culture, values and lessons of the past to the current generation; and to prepare our children for the world in which they will live. Preparing children for the world in which they will live is becoming more difficult than ever. In retrospect, there has been a confluence of changes that have significantly impacted the direction of modern education.
  • COMPUTER AGE: INTERACTIVE WHITEBOARD

    COMPUTER AGE: INTERACTIVE WHITEBOARD
    A high-tech upgrade to the chalkboard, the interective board meshed the computer with the ability for students to manipulate lesson digitally, in a real time.
  • DIGITAL AGE

    DIGITAL AGE
    The digital age, also called the information age, is defined as the time period starting with the introduction of the personal computer with subsequent technology introduced providing the ability to transfer information freely and quickly. In 1995, the Web enabled the development of the first learning management systems (LMSs), such as WebCT. LMSs provide an online teaching environment, where content can be loaded and organized.
  • INTERACTIVE AGE

    INTERACTIVE AGE
    Interactive learning takes into account the ubiquity of digital media and includes instructional strategies with engagement that is enhanced by digital media. Instructional approaches to implement this system of learning can include making customization lesson plans to factor in children’s developmental needs. This would require a gradual transition from passive learning to assessing children’s learning in real time.