Space Technology

Timeline created by Muhaymin BJ
  • Period:
    1,977 BCE
    to
    1,977 BCE

    Voyagers 1 and 2

    Voyager 1 is a space probe that was launched by NASA on September 5, 1977. Part of the Voyager program to study the outer Solar System, Voyager 1 was launched 16 days after its twin, Voyager 2.
  • Period:
    1,906 BCE
    to
    1,997 BCE

    Clyde Tombaugh

    Clyde William Tombaugh was an American astronomer. He discovered Pluto in 1930, the first object to be discovered in what would later be identified as the Kuiper belt. At the time of discovery, Pluto was considered a planet, but was later reclassified as a dwarf planet in 2006. Tombaugh also discovered many asteroids.
  • Period:
    1,811 BCE
    to
    1,877 BCE

    Urbain Le Verrier

  • Period:
    1,738 BCE
    to
    1,822 BCE

    William Herschel

    Frederick William Herschel KH, FRS was a German-born British astronomer and composer of music. He frequently collaborated with his younger sister and fellow astronomer Caroline Lucretia Herschel.
  • Period:
    1,656 BCE
    to
    1,742 BCE

    Edmond Halley

    Edmund Halley made several discoveries throughout his life. He is of course most famous for discovering that comets orbit the sun in a predictable way. He reasoned that comet sightings in 1531, 1607, and 1682 were made by one single comet returning every 76 years. ... This comet later became known as Halley's Comet.
  • Period:
    1,571 BCE
    to
    1,630 BCE

    Johannes Kepler

    They describe how (1) planets move in elliptical orbits with the Sun as a focus, (2) a planet covers the same area of space in the same amount of time no matter where it is in its orbit, and (3) a planet's orbital period is proportional to the size of its orbit (its semi-major axis).
  • Period:
    1,564 BCE
    to
    1,642 BCE

    Galileo Galilei

    Image result for Galileo Galilei discovering
    Galileo's discoveries about the Moon, Jupiter's moons, Venus, and sunspots supported the idea that the Sun - not the Earth - was the center of the Universe, as was commonly believed at the time. Galileo's work laid the foundation for today's modern space probes and telescopes.
  • Period:
    1,473 BCE
    to
    1,543 BCE

    Nicolaus Copernicus

    Nicolaus Copernicus was an astronomer who proposed a heliocentric system, that the planets orbit around the Sun; that Earth is a planet which, besides orbiting the Sun annually, also turns once daily on its own axis; and that very slow changes in the direction of this axis account for the precession of the equinoxes.
  • Period:
    100
    to
    170

    Claudius Ptolemy

    Ptolemy was an astronomer and mathematician. He believed that the Earth was the center of the Universe. The word for earth in Greek is geo, so we call this idea a "geocentric" theory.
  • Period: to
    AD 1

    Discovery of the first four asteroids

    he orbits of the first four asteroids are shown in Figure 1. Each was important enough to merit an individual glyph.