Renaissance/Reformation/Scientific Revolution Timeline Project

Timeline created by kayyy69
In History
  • 1440

    Printing Revolution

    Printing Revolution
    A printing press is a mechanical device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium, thereby transferring the ink.
  • Jan 1, 1449

    Lorenzo De' Medici

    Lorenzo De' Medici
    Lorenzo De' Medici was an Italian statesman, de facto ruler of the Florentine Republic and the most powerful and enthusiastic patron of Renaissance culture in Italy. Also known as Lorenzo the Magnificent by contemporary Florentines, he was a magnate, diplomat, politician and patron of scholars, artists and poets.
  • Apr 15, 1452

    Leonardo Da Vinci

    Leonardo Da Vinci
    Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci, more commonly Leonardo da Vinci, was an Italian polymath of the Renaissance whose areas of interest included invention, drawing, painting, sculpture, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, paleontology, and cartography.
  • May 21, 1471

    Albrecht Durer

    Albrecht Durer
    Albrecht Dürer, sometimes spelt in English as Durer or Duerer, without umlaut, was a painter, printmaker, and theorist of the German Renaissance. Born in Nuremberg, Dürer established his reputation and influence across Europe when he was still in his twenties due to his high-quality woodcut prints.
  • Feb 19, 1473

    Copernicus

    Copernicus
    Copernicus was a Renaissance-era mathematician and astronomer, who formulated a model of the universe that placed the Sun rather than Earth at the center of the universe, in all likelihood independently of Aristarchus of Samos, who had formulated such a model some eighteen centuries earlier.
  • Mar 6, 1475

    Michelangelo

    Michelangelo
    Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni, known best as simply Michelangelo, was an Italian sculptor, painter, architect and poet of the High Renaissance born in the Republic of Florence, who exerted an unparalleled influence on the development of Western art.
  • 1478

    Inquisition

    Inquisition
    The Inquisition was a group of institutions within the Catholic Church whose aim was to combat heresy. The Inquisition started in 12th-century France to combat religious dissent, in particular the Cathars and the Waldensians.
  • Feb 7, 1478

    Thomas More

    Thomas More
    Thomas More, venerated in the Catholic Church as Saint Thomas More, was an English lawyer, social philosopher, author, statesman, and noted Renaissance humanist. He was also a Chancellor to Henry VIII, and Lord High Chancellor of England from October 1529 to 16 May 1532.
  • Apr 6, 1483

    Raphael

    Raphael
    Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino, known as Raphael, was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. His work is admired for its clarity of form, ease of composition, and visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur.
  • Nov 10, 1483

    Martin Luther

    Martin Luther
    Martin Luther, O.S.A., was a German professor of theology, composer, priest, monk, and a seminal figure in the Protestant Reformation. Luther was ordained to the priesthood in 1507. He came to reject several teachings and practices of the Roman Catholic Church; in particular, he disputed the view on indulgences.
  • Jul 2, 1489

    Thomas Cranmer

    Thomas Cranmer
    Thomas Cranmer was a leader of the English Reformation and Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI and, for a short time, Mary I.
  • Jul 10, 1509

    John Calvin

    John Calvin
    John Calvin was a French theologian, pastor and reformer in Geneva during the Protestant Reformation.
  • 1517

    Sale of Indulgences

    Sale of Indulgences
    An sale of indulgence was a payment to the Catholic Church that purchased an exemption from punishment penance for some types of sins.
  • Sep 7, 1533

    Elizabeth I

    Elizabeth I
    Elizabeth I was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called the Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last of the five monarchs of the House of Tudor.
  • 1543

    Heliocentric Theory

    Heliocentric Theory
    Heliocentrism is the astronomical model in which the Earth and planets revolve around the Sun at the center of the Solar System. Historically, heliocentrism was opposed to geocentrism, which placed the Earth at the center.
  • Jan 22, 1561

    Francis Bacon

    Francis Bacon
    Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban, PC QC was an English philosopher and statesman who served as Attorney General and as Lord Chancellor of England. His works are credited with developing the scientific method and remained influential through the scientific revolution. Bacon has been called the father of empiricism.
  • 1564

    Scientific Method

    Scientific Method
    The scientific method is an empirical method of acquiring knowledge that has characterized the development of science since at least the 17th century. It involves careful observation, applying rigorous skepticism about what is observed, given that cognitive assumptions can distort how one interprets the observation.
  • Feb 15, 1564

    Galileo

    Galileo
    Galileo Galilei was an astronomer, physicist and engineer, sometimes described as a polymath from Pisa. Galileo has been called the "father of observational astronomy", the "father of modern physics", the "father of the scientific method", and the "father of modern science".
  • Apr 26, 1564

    William Shakespeare

    William Shakespeare
    William Shakespeare was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's greatest dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon".
  • Isaac Newton

    Isaac Newton
    Isaac Newton PRS was an English mathematician, physicist, astronomer, theologian, and author who is widely recognized as one of the most influential scientists of all time, and a key figure in the scientific revolution.
  • Humanism

    Humanism
    Humanism is a philosophical and ethical stance that emphasizes the value and agency of human beings, individually and collectively, and generally prefers critical thinking and evidence over acceptance of dogma or superstition.