Programming Languages

Timeline created by EmiLoving
  • Plankalkul

    Computer language designed for engineering purposes by Konrad Zuse between 1943 and 1945. It was the first high-level non-von Neumann programming language to be designed for a computer.
  • Fortran

    Originally developed by IBM at their campus in south San Jose, California[1] in the 1950s for scientific and engineering applications, Fortran came to dominate this area of programming early on and has been in continual use for over half a century in computationally intensive areas such as numerical weather prediction, finite element analysis, computational fluid dynamics, computational physics and computational chemistry.
  • MATH-MATIC

    Marketing name for the AT-3 compiler. Early programming language for UNIVAC I and UNIVAC II. Intended as an improvement over FORTRAN. Created by a group led by Charles Katz.
  • Lisp

    Originally specified in 1958, Lisp is the second-oldest high-level programming language in widespread use today; only Fortran is older (by one year).
  • COBOL

    One of the oldest programming languages, primarily designed by Grace Hopper. Its name is an acronym for COmmon Business-Oriented Language.
  • RPG

    High-level programming language (HLL) for business applications. While IBM is the creator and primary vendor of RPG, the language is available from other mainframe and microcomputer manufacturers, including Unisys.
  • RPG

    High-level programming language (HLL) for business applications. While IBM is the creator and primary vendor of RPG, the language is available from other mainframe and microcomputer manufacturers, including Unisys.
  • BASIC

    (Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) Designed in 1964 by John George Kemeny and Thomas Eugene Kurtz at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, USA to provide computer access to non-science students.
  • LOGO

    Multi-paradigm computer programming language used in education.
  • B

    B is a programming language that was developed at Bell Labs. It is extinct, having been superseded by the C language.
  • PASCAL

    Influential imperative and procedural programming language, designed in 1968–1969 and published in 1970 by Niklaus Wirth as a small and efficient language intended to encourage good programming practices using structured programming and data structuring.
  • C

    General-purpose programming language initially developed by Dennis Ritchie between 1969 and 1973 at AT&T Bell Labs.
  • ML

    General-purpose functional programming language developed by Robin Milner and others in the early 1970s at the University of Edinburgh,[1] whose syntax is inspired by ISWIM. Historically, ML stands for metalanguage.
  • SQL

    Structured Query Language is a special-purpose programming language designed for managing data in relational database management systems (RDBMS).
  • ADA

    Named after Ada Lovelace, it was made to supersede the hundreds of programming languages
  • C++

    Regarded as an intermediate-level language, as it comprises a combination of both high-level and low-level language features.
  • Python

    General-purpose, high-level programming language whose design philosophy emphasizes code readability. Its syntax is said to be clear and expressive. Python has a large and comprehensive standard library.
  • Visual Basic

    Third-generation event-driven programming language and integrated development environment (IDE) from Microsoft for its COM programming model first released in 1991. Visual Basic is designed to be relatively easy to learn and use.
  • Javascript

    Open source client-side scripting language commonly implemented as part of a web browser in order to create enhanced user interfaces and dynamic websites.
  • Delphi

    Developed by Borland and is the descendant of Turbo Pascal.
  • Java

    Originally developed by James Gosling at Sun Microsystems (which has since merged into Oracle Corporation) and released in 1995 as a core component of Sun Microsystems' Java platform.
  • PHP

    Open source server-side scripting language designed for Web development to produce dynamic Web pages. It is one of the first developed server-side scripting languages to be embedded into an HTML source document rather than calling an external file to process data.