time line on the the american revoulotion.

Timeline created by pestellom11
In History
  • Proclomation of 1763

    Proclomation of 1763
    The end of the French and Indian War in 1763 was a cause for great celebration in the colonies, for it removed several ominous barriers and opened up a host of new opportunities for the colonists.
  • The Sugar Act

    The Sugar Act
    On April 5, 1764, Parliament passed a modified version of the Sugar and Molasses Act (1733), which was about to expire. Under the Molasses Act colonial merchants had been required to pay a tax of six pence per gallon on the importation of foreign molasses. But because of corruption, they mostly evaded the taxes and undercut the intention of the tax — that the English product would be cheaper than that from the French West Indies.
  • The Currency Act

    The Currency Act
    The colonies suffered a constant shortage of currency with which to conduct trade. There were no gold or silver mines and currency could only be obtained through trade as regulated by Great Britain. Many of the colonies felt no alternative to printing their own paper money in the form of Bills of Credit. But because there were no common regulations and in fact no standard value on which to base the notes, confusion ensued.
  • The Stamp Act

    The Stamp Act
    On February 6th, 1765 George Grenville rose in Parliament to offer the fifty-five resolutions of his Stamp Bill. A motion was offered to first read petitions from the Virginia colony and others was denied. The bill was passed on February 17, approved by the Lords on March 8th, and two weeks later ordered in effect by the King. The Stamp Act was Parliament's first serious attempt to assert governmental authority over the colonies.
  • The Quartering Act of 1765

    The Quartering Act of 1765
    An act for punishing mutiny and desertion, and for the better payment of the army and their quarters.
  • The Declaratory Act

    The Declaratory Act
    AN ACT for the better securing the dependency of his Majesty's dominions in America upon the crown and parliament of Great Britain.
  • The Boston Massacre

    The Boston Massacre
    The Boston Massacre was a street fight that occurred on March 5, 1770, between a "patriot" mob, throwing snowballs, stones, and sticks, and a squad of British soldiers. Several colonists were killed and this led to a campaign by speech-writers to rouse the ire of the citizenry.
  • The Tea Act

    The Tea Act
    The Tea Act, passed by Parliament on May 10, 1773, would launch the final spark to the revolutionary movement in Boston. The act was not intended to raise revenue in the American colonies, and in fact imposed no new taxes. I
  • The Boston Tea Party

    The Boston Tea Party
    Was adirect action by colonists in Boston, a town in the British colony of Massachusetts, against the British government and the monopolistic East India Company that controlled all the tea coming into the colonies. On December 16, 1773, after officials in Boston refused to return three shiploads of taxed tea to Britain, a group of colonists boarded the ships and destroyed the tea by throwing it into Boston Harbor. The incident remains an iconic event of American history, and other political pro
  • George Washington:The Commander In Chief

    George Washington:The Commander In Chief
    As the Commander in Chief of the Continental Army the services and achievements of George Washington are unique in the world's history. He was much more than the Commander in Chief. He was the one necessary person, whose calm, unswerving, determined sense of patriotic duty to country, and ability put real backbone into the Revolution and kept it from collapsing or merging into a civil conflict, under the hardships and unexpected privations encountered during the eight years of war.
  • Articles of Confederation

    Articles of Confederation
    The Articles of Confederation was the first constitution of the United States of America and specified how the national government was to operate.