computer history

Timeline created by rahmanlasalle24
  • Zuse and the first computer

    Zuse made a mechanical calculator called the Z1, the first binary computer.
  • Zues and the Z2

    Zues and the Z2
    In 1939, Zuse completed the Z2, the first fully functioning electro-mechanical computer.
  • Zuse and the first electronic computer

    Konrad Zuse completed the Z3 in 1941, with recycled materials donated by fellow university staff and students. This was the world's first electronic, fully programmable digital computer based on a binary floating-point number and switching system.
  • Harvard Mark-1 is completed.

    Harvard Mark-1 is completed.
    Harvard Mark-1 is completed. Conceived by Harvard professor Howard Aiken, and designed and built by IBM, the Harvard Mark-1 was a room-sized, relay-based calculator. The machine had a fifty-foot long camshaft that synchronized the machine’s thousands of component parts. The Mark-1 was used to produce mathematical tables but was soon superseded by stored program computers.
  • John von Neumann wrote "First Draft of a Report on the EDVAC"

    John von Neumann wrote "First Draft of a Report on the EDVAC"
    John von Neumann wrote "First Draft of a Report on the EDVAC" in which he outlined the architecture of a stored-program computer.
  • Invention of vacuum tubes used on computers at the time

    On December 23, William Shockley, Walter Brattain, and John Bardeen successfully tested this point-contact transistor, setting off the semiconductor revolution. Improved models of the transistor, developed at AT&T Bell Laboratories, supplanted vacuum tubes used on computers at the time
  • The IBM 650

    The IBM 650
    The IBM 650 magnetic drum calculator established itself as the first mass-produced computer, with the company selling 450 in one year. Spinning at 12,500 rpm, the 650´s magnetic data-storage drum allowed much faster access to stored material than drum memory machines.
  • PDP-8

    PDP-8
    Digital Equipment Corp. introduced the PDP-8, the first commercially successful minicomputer. The PDP-8 sold for $18,000, one-fifth the price of a small IBM 360 mainframe. The speed, small size, and reasonable cost enabled the PDP-8 to go into thousands of manufacturing plants, small businesses, and scientific laboratories.
  • HP-35

    HP-35
    Hewlett-Packard announced the HP-35 as "a fast, extremely accurate electronic slide rule" with a solid-state memory similar to that of a computer. The HP-35 distinguished itself from its competitors by its ability to perform a broad variety of logarithmic and trigonometric functions, to store more intermediate solutions for later use, and to accept and display entries in a form similar to standard scientific notation.
  • Atari introduces the Model 400 and 800 Computer.

    Atari introduces the Model 400 and 800 Computer.
    Atari introduces the Model 400 and 800 Computer. Shortly after delivery of the Atari VCS game console, Atari designed two microcomputers with game capabilities: the Model 400 and Model 800. The two machines were built with the idea that the 400 would serve primarily as a game console while the 800 would be more of a home computer. Both sold well, though they had technical and marketing problems, and faced strong competition from the Apple II, Commodore PET, and TRS-80 computers.
  • Apple

    Apple introduced its Lisa. The first personal computer with a graphical user interface, its development was central in the move to such systems for personal computers. The Lisa´s sloth and high price ($10,000) led to its ultimate failure
  • Apple cofounder Steve Jobs, who left Apple to form his own company, unveiled the NeXT.

    Apple cofounder Steve Jobs, who left Apple to form his own company, unveiled the NeXT.
    Apple cofounder Steve Jobs, who left Apple to form his own company, unveiled the NeXT. The computer he created failed but was recognized as an important innovation. At a base price of $6,500, the NeXT ran too slowly to be popular.