Project Management: History

Timeline created by Diana Zoppi
In History
  • 1911 Frederick Taylor's "The Principle of Scientific Management"

    1911 Frederick Taylor's "The Principle of Scientific Management"
    Taylor's philosophy focused on the belief that making people work as hard as they could was not as efficient as optimizing the way the work was done. In 1909, Taylor published "The Principles of Scientific Management." In this, he proposed that by optimizing and simplifying jobs, productivity would increase.
  • Henry Gantt Chart

    Henry Gantt Chart
    The Gantt Chart is seen as a cornerstone of modern project management, yet it is hard to imagine the impact it had in the 1920s and 1930s, on US industry and Soviet Union central planning. And it has barely changed in the last 100 years. The only real difference is the technology we use to produce the charts and the consequent ease we have in using them to drive calculations.
  • 1940 Kanban

    1940 Kanban
    The name is literally billboard in Japanese. It helps manage workflow by placing tasks on a Kanban board where workflow and progress are clear to all participants. Kanban helps improve inefficiencies and has been used to schedule lean manufacturing in Agile projects.
  • 1956 The American Association of Cost Engineers

    1956 The American Association of Cost Engineers
    AACE has been active since 1956 when it was founded as the American Association of Cost Engineers. Today AACE is a global organization and the name AACE stands for Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering. The legal name since 1992 is AACE International. AACE mission is to empower AACE members to drive projects to complete on time, on cost, and meet investment and operational goals.
  • 1957 The critical path method (CPM) invented by the Dupont Corportation

    1957 The critical path method (CPM) invented by the Dupont Corportation
    Since it was first designed in 1957, the critical path method has become an important way that business owners or project managers can oversee large undertakings. It encourages efficiency by dividing complicated efforts into a series of small tasks with costs and resources associated with each, and its development allows managers to see where potential breakdowns might occur and what resources are available to deal with them if that happens.
  • 1965 The International Project Management Association (IPMA)

    1965 The International Project Management Association (IPMA)
    European aircraft Project Manager, Pierre Koch of France, invited Dick Vullinghs from the Netherlands and Roland Gutsch from Germany to discuss the benefits of the CPM as a management approach. This group was chaired by Yves Eugene from AFIRO (Association Française d´Informatique et de Recherche Opérationnelle). Professor Arnold Kaufmann suggested the formation of an INTERnational NETwork, the INTERNET. The exchange of experiences in IPMA (formerly INTERNET) has a long tradition.
  • 1969 The nonprofit Project Management Institute (PMI)

    1969 The nonprofit Project Management Institute (PMI)
    In Philadelphia, Jim Snyder, of Smith, Kline & French Laboratories, and Gordon Davis, of the Georgia Institute of Technology, were having dinner and decided there was a need for an organization that offered PM a forum to share information and discuss their industry. Later that year, the first formal meeting of the burgeoning organization took place at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Articles of incorporation were filed in Pennsylvania and signed by the five founders of PMI.
  • 1970 Waterfall model

    1970 Waterfall model
    Winston W. Royce. It was the first process model to be introduced and is simple and easy to understand. Waterfall method has seen an abundant usage in projects where the needs or requirements are well understood and do not change much over time. It follows a linear development by phases with clearly defined stage gates and review processes. Each of the phases is cascaded down and will start when the defined goals are met by the previous phase and signed off.
  • 1984 The management philosophy Theory of Constraints (TOC) was develop by Dr. Eliyahu M. Goldratt

    1984 The management philosophy Theory of Constraints (TOC) was develop by Dr. Eliyahu M. Goldratt
    The theory of constraints says that a small number of constraints prevents any management system from achieving more of its goals. There is always at least one constraint, and the theory of constraints uses what is called a focusing process to identify that constraint, and then restructures to address it.
    The theory of constraints works to find the weakest link and lessen its vulnerability.
  • 1986 Scrum

    1986 Scrum
    Scrum was born out of the manufacturing in 1986 and extended by the software development industry as an agile methodology to counter established waterfall-style project management processes.
    Jeff Sutherland working with Ken Schwaber, developed Scrum as a formal process in 1995. In 2001, Sutherland and Schwaber, with several pioneers of agile thinking converged in Utah to assess commonalities in agile methods. The Agile Manifesto was created out of this group’s consensus.
  • 1989 Earned Value Management (EVM) came to prominence as a technique in Project Management

    1989 Earned Value Management (EVM) came to prominence as a technique in Project Management
    Earned value management is a project management technique for measuring project performance and progress. It has the ability to combine measurements of the project management triangle: scope, time, and costs. In a single integrated system, earned value management is able to provide accurate forecasts of project performance problems, which is an important contribution for project management.
  • 1989 Projects in Controlled Environments (PRINCE)

    1989 Projects in Controlled Environments (PRINCE)
    Key features of PRINCE:
    Focus on business justification
    Defined organization structure for the project management team
    Product-based planning approach
    Emphasis on dividing the project into manageable and controllable stages.
    The flexibility that can be applied at a level appropriate to the project.
  • 1990 Extreme Programming (XP)

    1990 Extreme Programming (XP)
    Extreme programming (XP) is a software development methodology which is intended to improve software quality and responsiveness to changing customer requirements. As a type of agile software development,[1][2][3] it advocates frequent "releases" in short development cycles, which is intended to improve productivity and introduce checkpoints at which new customer requirements can be adopted.
  • 1997 Eliyahu M. Goldratt developed Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM)

    1997 Eliyahu M. Goldratt developed Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM)
    CCPM based on the method and algorithms of his Theory of Constraints. It is a method of planning and managing projects that emphasizes the resources (people, equipment, physical space) required to execute project tasks. It differs from more traditional methods that derive from the critical path and PERT algorithms, which emphasize task order and rigid scheduling. A critical chain project network strives to keep resources leveled, and requires that they be flexible in start times.
  • 2001 Agile as a project style was codified with the creation of the Agile Manifesto or the Software Development Manifesto

    2001 Agile as a project style was codified with the creation of the Agile Manifesto or the Software Development Manifesto
    We are uncovering better ways of developing
    software by doing it and helping others do it.
    Through this work we have come to value: Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
    Working software over comprehensive documentation
    Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
    Responding to change over following a plan That is, while there is value in the items on
    the right, we value the items on the left more.
  • 2008 ProjectManager.com is released, bringing project management into the cloud

    2008 ProjectManager.com is released, bringing project management into the cloud
    Founded in NZ- ProjectManager.com is founded in beautiful New Zealand, home of “Lord of the Rings”.