US History

Timeline created by juansoto123
  • model t

    model t
    an automobile with a 2.9-liter, 4-cylinder engine, produced by the Ford Motor Company from 1909 through 1927, considered to be the first motor vehicle successfully mass-produced on an assembly line
  • • Assissination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

    •	Assissination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand
    The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, occurred on 28 June 1914
  • • Trench Warfare, Poison Gas, and Machine Guns

    •	Trench Warfare, Poison Gas, and Machine Guns
    Trench warfare is a type of land warfare using occupied fighting lines consisting largely of military trenches, in which troops are well-protected from the enemy's small arms fire
  • • Sinking of the Lusitania

    •	Sinking of the Lusitania
    The sinking of the Cunard ocean liner RMS Lusitania occurred on Friday, 7 May 1915 during the First World War, as Germany waged submarine warfare against the United Kingdom
  • • Zimmerman Telegram

    •	Zimmerman Telegram
    The Zimmermann Telegram (or Zimmermann Note or Zimmerman Cable) was a secret diplomatic communication issued from the German Foreign Office in January 1917 that proposed a military alliance between Germany and Mexico
  • • Russian Revolution

    •	Russian Revolution
    The Russian Revolution was a pair of revolutions in Russia in 1917 which dismantled the Tsarist autocracy and led to the rise of the Soviet Union
  • • U.S. entry into WWI

    •	U.S. entry into WWI
    U.S. Entry into World War I, 1917. On April 2, 1917, President Woodrow Wilson went before a joint session of Congress to request a declaration of war against Germany.
  • • Battle of Argonne Forest

    •	Battle of Argonne Forest
    The Meuse-Argonne Offensive, also known as the Maas-Argonne Offensive and the Battle of the Argonne Forest, was a major part of the final Allied offensive of World War I that stretched along the entire Western Front. It was fought from 26 September 1918 until the Armistice of 11 November 1918, a total of 47 days.
  • • Armistice

    •	Armistice
    Armistice Day is commemorated every year on 11 November to mark the armistice signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany at Compiègne, France, for the cessation of hostilities on the Western
  • • Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points

    •	Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points
    Thomas Woodrow Wilson was an American statesman and academic who served as the 28th President of the United States from 1913 to 1921
  • • Treaty of Versailles

    •	Treaty of Versailles
    The Treaty of Versailles was the most important of the peace treaties that brought World War I to an end. The Treaty ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers
  • president hardings return to normalcy

    president hardings return to normalcy
    Return to normalcy, a return to the way of life before World War I, was United States presidential candidate Warren G. Harding's campaign slogan for the election of 1920. ... Harding's promise was to return the United States prewar mentality, without the thought of war tainting the minds of the American people.
  • Harlem Renaissance

    Harlem Renaissance
    The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York, spanning the 1920s. During the time, it was known as the "New Negro Movement", named after the 1925 anthology by Alain Locke
  • red scare

    red scare
    A "Red Scare" is promotion of widespread fear by a society or state about a potential rise of communism, anarchism, or radical leftism. The term is most often used to refer to two periods
  • Tea Pot Dome Scandel

    Tea Pot Dome Scandel
    The Teapot Dome Scandal was a bribery incident that took place in the United States from 1921 to 1922, during the administration of President Warren G. Harding.
  • Joseph Stalin Leads USSR

    Joseph Stalin Leads USSR
    Synonyms: Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili, Stalin Example of: commie, communist. a socialist who advocates communism. The only post-imperial Kremlin leader who served a longer term was Joseph Stalin
  • Scopes Monkey Trial

    Scopes Monkey Trial
    The Scopes Trial, formally known as The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes and commonly referred to as the Scopes Monkey Trial, was an American legal case in July 1925
  • Mein Kampf published

    Mein Kampf published
    Mein Kampf is a 1925 autobiographical book by Nazi Party leader Adolf Hitler. The work describes the process by which Hitler became antisemitic and outlines his political ideology and future plans for Germany.
  • Charles Lindberghs Trans Antlantic Flight

    Charles Lindberghs Trans Antlantic Flight
    5:22pm - The Spirit of St. Louis touches down at the Le Bourget Aerodrome, Paris, France. Local time: 10:22pm. Total flight time: 33 hours, 30 minutes, 29.8 seconds. Charles Lindbergh had not slept in 55 hours.
  • St Valentines Day Massacre

    St Valentines Day Massacre
    The Saint Valentine's Day Massacre is the name given to the 1929 murder in Chicago of seven men of the North Side gang during the Prohibition Era
  • Stock Market Crashes Black Tuesday

    Stock Market Crashes Black Tuesday
    The Wall Street Crash of 1929, also known as Black Tuesday (October 29), the Great Crash, or the Stock Market Crash of 1929, began on October 24, 1929 ("Black Thursday"), and was the most devastating stock market crash in the history of the United States (acting as the most significant predicting indicator of the Great ...
  • • Hoovervilles

    •	Hoovervilles
    a shantytown built by unemployed and destitute people during the Depression of the early 1930s.
  • • Smoot-Hawley Tariff

    •	Smoot-Hawley Tariff
    ch. 4), otherwise known as the Smoot–Hawley Tariff or Hawley–Smoot Tariff, was an act implementing protectionist trade policies sponsored by Senator Reed Smoot and Representative Willis C. Hawley and signed into law on June 17, 1930. The act raised U.S. tariffs on over 20,000 imported goods.
  • • 100, 000 Banks Have Failed

    •	100, 000 Banks Have Failed
    So here's a rundown on what's covered – what's not covered – by the FDIC, or Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. You've no doubt already heard that the FDIC generally insures deposits of up to $100,000 in FDIC-insured banks. (If you're not sure whether your bank is FDIC-insured, you can find out on their Web site.Jul 18, 2008
  • • Agriculture Adjustment Administration (AAA)

    •	Agriculture Adjustment Administration (AAA)
    The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) was a federal law passed in 1933 as part of U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal. The law offered farmers subsidies in exchange for limiting their production of certain crops. The subsidies were meant to limit overproduction so that crop prices could increase.
  • • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FCID)

    •	Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FCID)
    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation is a United States government corporation providing deposit insurance to depositors in US banks.
  • • Public Works Administration (PWA)

    •	Public Works Administration (PWA)
    Public Works Administration, part of the New Deal of 1933 was a large-scale public works construction agency in the United States headed by Secretary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes
  • Hitler appointed Chancellor of Germany

    Hitler appointed Chancellor of Germany
    President Paul von Hindenburg had already appointed Hitler as Chancellor on 30 January 1933 after a series of parliamentary elections and associated backroom intrigues. ... Adolf Hitler rose to a place of prominence in the early years of the party
  • • Dust Bowl

    •	Dust Bowl
    an area of land where vegetation has been lost and soil reduced to dust and eroded, especially as a consequence of drought or unsuitable farming practice.
  • • Social Security Administration (SSA)

    •	Social Security Administration (SSA)
    The United States Social Security Administration is an independent agency of the U.S. federal government that administers Social Security, a social insurance program consisting of retirement, disability, and survivors' benefits.
  • Rape of Nanjing

    Rape of Nanjing
    The Nanking Massacre was an episode of mass murder and mass rape committed by Japanese troops against the residents of Nanjing, then the capital of the Republic of China, during the Second Sino-Japanese War
  • Kristallnacht

    Kristallnacht
    Kristallnacht or Reichskristallnacht, also referred to as the Night of Broken Glass, Reichspogromnacht or simply Pogromnacht, and Novemberpogrome, was a pogrom against Jews throughout Nazi Germany on
  • Hitler invades Poland

    Hitler invades Poland
    The Invasion of Poland, known in Poland as the September Campaign (Kampania wrześniowa) or the 1939 Defensive War (Wojna obronna 1939 roku), and in Germany as the Poland Campaign (Polenfeldzug) or Fall Weiss ("Case White"), was a joint invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union, the Free City of Danzig, and a ...
  • German Blitzkrieg attacks

    German Blitzkrieg attacks
    2 any sudden intensive attack or concerted effort. 3 (American football) a defensive charge on the quarterback. vb. 4 tr to attack suddenly and intensively. (C20: shortened from German Blitzkrieg lightning war)
  • Pearl Habor

    Pearl Habor
    The attack on Pearl Harbor was a surprise military strike by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Territory, on the morning of December 7, 1941.
  • Tuskegee Airmen

    Tuskegee Airmen
    The Tuskegee Airmen is the popular name of a group of African-American military pilots who fought in World War II. Officially, they formed the 332nd Fighter Group and the 477th Bombardment Group of the United States Army Air Forces
  • Navajo Code Talkers

    Navajo Code Talkers
    The name code talkers is strongly associated with bilingual Navajo speakers specially recruited during World War II by the Marines to serve in their standard communications units in the Pacific Theater. Code talking, however, was pioneered by the Cherokee and Choctaw peoples during World War I.
  • Executive Order 9066

    Executive Order 9066
    Executive Order 9066 was a United States presidential executive order signed and issued during World War II by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942.
  • Bataan Death March

    Bataan Death March
    The Bataan Death March was the forcible transfer by the Imperial Japanese Army of 60,000–80,000 Filipino and American prisoners of war from Saysain Point, Bagac, Bataan and Mariveles to Camp O'Donnell,
  • Invasion Of Normandy (D-Day)

    Invasion Of Normandy (D-Day)
    The Western Allies of World War II launched the largest amphibious invasion in history when they assaulted Normandy, located on the northern coast of France, on 6 June 1944
  • Atomic Bombing Of Nagasaki And Hiroshima

    Atomic Bombing Of Nagasaki And Hiroshima
    During the final stage of World War II, the United States dropped nuclear weapons on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively.
  • Victory Over Japan/pacific (VJ/VP) Day

    Victory Over Japan/pacific (VJ/VP) Day
    The name, V-J Day, had been selected by the Allies after they named V-E Day for the victory in Europe. On September 2, 1945, a formal surrender ceremony was performed in Tokyo Bay, Japan, aboard the battleship USS Missouri.
  • Liberation Of Concentration Camps

    Liberation Of Concentration Camps
    Soviet soldiers were the first to liberate concentration camp prisoners in the final stages of the war. On July 23, 1944, they entered the Majdanek camp in Poland, and later overran several other killing centers. On January 27, 1945, they entered Auschwitz and there found hundreds of sick and exhausted prisoners.
  • Victory In Europe (VE) Day

    Victory In Europe (VE) Day
    Victory in Europe Day, generally known as V-E Day, VE Day or simply V Day, was the public holiday celebrated on 8 May 1945 to mark the formal acceptance by the Allies of World War II of Nazi Germany's unconditional surrender of its armed forces
  • United Nations Formed

  • Germany devided

  • Numbering Trails

    Numbering Trails
    The Nuremberg trials were a series of trials held between 1945 and 1949 in which the Allies prosecuted German military leaders, political officials, industrialists, and financiers for crimes they had committed during World War II.
  • • Truman Doctrine

  • • Marshall Plan

  • Berlin Airlift

  • NATO Formed

  • • Kim Il-sung invades South Korea

  • • UN forces push North Korea to Yalu River- the border with China

  • • Chinese forces cross Yalu and enter Korean War

  • Ethel and Julius Rosenberg Execution

  • • Armistice Signed

  • • Warsaw Pact Formed

  • Sputnik I

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    world war 1

    World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918
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    Roaring Twenties

    The Roaring Twenties was the period of Western society and Western culture that occurred during and around the 1920s
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    Great Depression

    a long and severe recession in an economy or market
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    : Franklin D. Roosevelt

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    New Deal Programs

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    The Holocaust

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    world war ll

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    Harry S. Truman

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    The Cold War

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    : Korean War