US History

Timeline created by juansoto123
  • 13th amendment

    13th amendment
    The Thirteenth Amendment (Amendment XIII) to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime. In Congress, it was passed by the Senate on April 8, 1864, and by the House on January 31, 1865.
  • 14th amendment

    14th amendment
    The 14th Amendment to the Constitution was ratified on July 9, 1868, and granted citizenship to “all persons born or naturalized in the United States,” which included former slaves recently freed.
  • 15th amendment

    15th amendment
    Passed by Congress February 26, 1869, and ratified February 3, 1870, the 15th amendment granted African American men the right to vote
  • jim crows laws start in south

    jim crows laws start in south
    Jim Crow law, in U.S. history, any of the laws that enforced racial segregation in the South between the end of Reconstruction in 1877 and the beginning of the civil rights movement in the 1950s.
  • plessy v. ferguson

    plessy v. ferguson
    Plessy v. Ferguson, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court, on May 18, 1896, by a seven-to-one majority (one justice did not participate), advanced the controversial “separate but equal” doctrine for assessing the constitutionality of racial segregation laws.
  • wright brothers airplane

    wright brothers airplane
    The brothers' fundamental breakthrough was their invention of three-axis control, which enabled the pilot to steer the aircraft effectively and to maintain its equilibrium.[4][5][6][7] This method became and remains standard on fixed-wing aircraft of all kinds.
  • model t

    model t
    an automobile with a 2.9-liter, 4-cylinder engine, produced by the Ford Motor Company from 1909 through 1927, considered to be the first motor vehicle successfully mass-produced on an assembly line
  • • Assissination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

    •	Assissination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand
    The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, occurred on 28 June 1914
  • • Trench Warfare, Poison Gas, and Machine Guns

    •	Trench Warfare, Poison Gas, and Machine Guns
    Trench warfare is a type of land warfare using occupied fighting lines consisting largely of military trenches, in which troops are well-protected from the enemy's small arms fire
  • • Sinking of the Lusitania

    •	Sinking of the Lusitania
    The sinking of the Cunard ocean liner RMS Lusitania occurred on Friday, 7 May 1915 during the First World War, as Germany waged submarine warfare against the United Kingdom
  • • Zimmerman Telegram

    •	Zimmerman Telegram
    The Zimmermann Telegram (or Zimmermann Note or Zimmerman Cable) was a secret diplomatic communication issued from the German Foreign Office in January 1917 that proposed a military alliance between Germany and Mexico
  • • Russian Revolution

    •	Russian Revolution
    The Russian Revolution was a pair of revolutions in Russia in 1917 which dismantled the Tsarist autocracy and led to the rise of the Soviet Union
  • • U.S. entry into WWI

    •	U.S. entry into WWI
    U.S. Entry into World War I, 1917. On April 2, 1917, President Woodrow Wilson went before a joint session of Congress to request a declaration of war against Germany.
  • • Battle of Argonne Forest

    •	Battle of Argonne Forest
    The Meuse-Argonne Offensive, also known as the Maas-Argonne Offensive and the Battle of the Argonne Forest, was a major part of the final Allied offensive of World War I that stretched along the entire Western Front. It was fought from 26 September 1918 until the Armistice of 11 November 1918, a total of 47 days.
  • • Armistice

    •	Armistice
    Armistice Day is commemorated every year on 11 November to mark the armistice signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany at Compiègne, France, for the cessation of hostilities on the Western
  • • Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points

    •	Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points
    Thomas Woodrow Wilson was an American statesman and academic who served as the 28th President of the United States from 1913 to 1921
  • • Treaty of Versailles

    •	Treaty of Versailles
    The Treaty of Versailles was the most important of the peace treaties that brought World War I to an end. The Treaty ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers
  • president hardings return to normalcy

    president hardings return to normalcy
    Return to normalcy, a return to the way of life before World War I, was United States presidential candidate Warren G. Harding's campaign slogan for the election of 1920. ... Harding's promise was to return the United States prewar mentality, without the thought of war tainting the minds of the American people.
  • Harlem Renaissance

    Harlem Renaissance
    The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York, spanning the 1920s. During the time, it was known as the "New Negro Movement", named after the 1925 anthology by Alain Locke
  • red scare

    red scare
    A "Red Scare" is promotion of widespread fear by a society or state about a potential rise of communism, anarchism, or radical leftism. The term is most often used to refer to two periods
  • Tea Pot Dome Scandel

    Tea Pot Dome Scandel
    The Teapot Dome Scandal was a bribery incident that took place in the United States from 1921 to 1922, during the administration of President Warren G. Harding.
  • Joseph Stalin Leads USSR

    Joseph Stalin Leads USSR
    Synonyms: Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili, Stalin Example of: commie, communist. a socialist who advocates communism. The only post-imperial Kremlin leader who served a longer term was Joseph Stalin
  • Scopes Monkey Trial

    Scopes Monkey Trial
    The Scopes Trial, formally known as The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes and commonly referred to as the Scopes Monkey Trial, was an American legal case in July 1925
  • Mein Kampf published

    Mein Kampf published
    Mein Kampf is a 1925 autobiographical book by Nazi Party leader Adolf Hitler. The work describes the process by which Hitler became antisemitic and outlines his political ideology and future plans for Germany.
  • Charles Lindberghs Trans Antlantic Flight

    Charles Lindberghs Trans Antlantic Flight
    5:22pm - The Spirit of St. Louis touches down at the Le Bourget Aerodrome, Paris, France. Local time: 10:22pm. Total flight time: 33 hours, 30 minutes, 29.8 seconds. Charles Lindbergh had not slept in 55 hours.
  • St Valentines Day Massacre

    St Valentines Day Massacre
    The Saint Valentine's Day Massacre is the name given to the 1929 murder in Chicago of seven men of the North Side gang during the Prohibition Era
  • Stock Market Crashes Black Tuesday

    Stock Market Crashes Black Tuesday
    The Wall Street Crash of 1929, also known as Black Tuesday (October 29), the Great Crash, or the Stock Market Crash of 1929, began on October 24, 1929 ("Black Thursday"), and was the most devastating stock market crash in the history of the United States (acting as the most significant predicting indicator of the Great ...
  • • Hoovervilles

    •	Hoovervilles
    a shantytown built by unemployed and destitute people during the Depression of the early 1930s.
  • • Smoot-Hawley Tariff

    •	Smoot-Hawley Tariff
    ch. 4), otherwise known as the Smoot–Hawley Tariff or Hawley–Smoot Tariff, was an act implementing protectionist trade policies sponsored by Senator Reed Smoot and Representative Willis C. Hawley and signed into law on June 17, 1930. The act raised U.S. tariffs on over 20,000 imported goods.
  • • 100, 000 Banks Have Failed

    •	100, 000 Banks Have Failed
    So here's a rundown on what's covered – what's not covered – by the FDIC, or Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. You've no doubt already heard that the FDIC generally insures deposits of up to $100,000 in FDIC-insured banks. (If you're not sure whether your bank is FDIC-insured, you can find out on their Web site.Jul 18, 2008
  • • Agriculture Adjustment Administration (AAA)

    •	Agriculture Adjustment Administration (AAA)
    The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) was a federal law passed in 1933 as part of U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal. The law offered farmers subsidies in exchange for limiting their production of certain crops. The subsidies were meant to limit overproduction so that crop prices could increase.
  • • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FCID)

    •	Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FCID)
    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation is a United States government corporation providing deposit insurance to depositors in US banks.
  • • Public Works Administration (PWA)

    •	Public Works Administration (PWA)
    Public Works Administration, part of the New Deal of 1933 was a large-scale public works construction agency in the United States headed by Secretary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes
  • Hitler appointed Chancellor of Germany

    Hitler appointed Chancellor of Germany
    President Paul von Hindenburg had already appointed Hitler as Chancellor on 30 January 1933 after a series of parliamentary elections and associated backroom intrigues. ... Adolf Hitler rose to a place of prominence in the early years of the party
  • • Dust Bowl

    •	Dust Bowl
    an area of land where vegetation has been lost and soil reduced to dust and eroded, especially as a consequence of drought or unsuitable farming practice.
  • • Social Security Administration (SSA)

    •	Social Security Administration (SSA)
    The United States Social Security Administration is an independent agency of the U.S. federal government that administers Social Security, a social insurance program consisting of retirement, disability, and survivors' benefits.
  • Rape of Nanjing

    Rape of Nanjing
    The Nanking Massacre was an episode of mass murder and mass rape committed by Japanese troops against the residents of Nanjing, then the capital of the Republic of China, during the Second Sino-Japanese War
  • Kristallnacht

    Kristallnacht
    Kristallnacht or Reichskristallnacht, also referred to as the Night of Broken Glass, Reichspogromnacht or simply Pogromnacht, and Novemberpogrome, was a pogrom against Jews throughout Nazi Germany on
  • Hitler invades Poland

    Hitler invades Poland
    The Invasion of Poland, known in Poland as the September Campaign (Kampania wrześniowa) or the 1939 Defensive War (Wojna obronna 1939 roku), and in Germany as the Poland Campaign (Polenfeldzug) or Fall Weiss ("Case White"), was a joint invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union, the Free City of Danzig, and a ...
  • German Blitzkrieg attacks

    German Blitzkrieg attacks
    2 any sudden intensive attack or concerted effort. 3 (American football) a defensive charge on the quarterback. vb. 4 tr to attack suddenly and intensively. (C20: shortened from German Blitzkrieg lightning war)
  • Pearl Habor

    Pearl Habor
    The attack on Pearl Harbor was a surprise military strike by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Territory, on the morning of December 7, 1941.
  • Tuskegee Airmen

    Tuskegee Airmen
    The Tuskegee Airmen is the popular name of a group of African-American military pilots who fought in World War II. Officially, they formed the 332nd Fighter Group and the 477th Bombardment Group of the United States Army Air Forces
  • Navajo Code Talkers

    Navajo Code Talkers
    The name code talkers is strongly associated with bilingual Navajo speakers specially recruited during World War II by the Marines to serve in their standard communications units in the Pacific Theater. Code talking, however, was pioneered by the Cherokee and Choctaw peoples during World War I.
  • Executive Order 9066

    Executive Order 9066
    Executive Order 9066 was a United States presidential executive order signed and issued during World War II by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942.
  • Bataan Death March

    Bataan Death March
    The Bataan Death March was the forcible transfer by the Imperial Japanese Army of 60,000–80,000 Filipino and American prisoners of war from Saysain Point, Bagac, Bataan and Mariveles to Camp O'Donnell,
  • Invasion Of Normandy (D-Day)

    Invasion Of Normandy (D-Day)
    The Western Allies of World War II launched the largest amphibious invasion in history when they assaulted Normandy, located on the northern coast of France, on 6 June 1944
  • Gi bill

    Gi bill
    G.I. Bill (of Rights), also called Servicemen's Readjustment Act, U.S. legislation passed in 1944 that provided benefits to World War II veterans.
  • Atomic Bombing Of Nagasaki And Hiroshima

    Atomic Bombing Of Nagasaki And Hiroshima
    During the final stage of World War II, the United States dropped nuclear weapons on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively.
  • Victory Over Japan/pacific (VJ/VP) Day

    Victory Over Japan/pacific (VJ/VP) Day
    The name, V-J Day, had been selected by the Allies after they named V-E Day for the victory in Europe. On September 2, 1945, a formal surrender ceremony was performed in Tokyo Bay, Japan, aboard the battleship USS Missouri.
  • Liberation Of Concentration Camps

    Liberation Of Concentration Camps
    Soviet soldiers were the first to liberate concentration camp prisoners in the final stages of the war. On July 23, 1944, they entered the Majdanek camp in Poland, and later overran several other killing centers. On January 27, 1945, they entered Auschwitz and there found hundreds of sick and exhausted prisoners.
  • Victory In Europe (VE) Day

    Victory In Europe (VE) Day
    Victory in Europe Day, generally known as V-E Day, VE Day or simply V Day, was the public holiday celebrated on 8 May 1945 to mark the formal acceptance by the Allies of World War II of Nazi Germany's unconditional surrender of its armed forces
  • United Nations Formed

    United Nations Formed
    The forerunner of the United Nations was the League of Nations, an organization conceived in similar circumstances during the first World War, and established in 1919 under the Treaty of Versailles "to promote international cooperation and to achieve peace and security."
  • Germany devided

    Germany devided
    On June 23, 1948, the western powers introduced a new form of currency into the western zones, which caused the Soviet Union to impose the Berlin Blockade one day later. After Germany was divided into two parts, East Germany built the Berlin Wall to prevent its citizens from fleeing to the west.
  • Numbering Trails

    Numbering Trails
    The Nuremberg trials were a series of trials held between 1945 and 1949 in which the Allies prosecuted German military leaders, political officials, industrialists, and financiers for crimes they had committed during World War II.
  • • Truman Doctrine

    •	Truman Doctrine
    The Truman Doctrine was an American foreign policy whose stated purpose was to counter Soviet geopolitical expansion during the Cold War. It was first announced to Congress by President Harry S. Truman on March 12, 1947 and further developed on July 12, 1948 when he pledged to contain threats to Greece and Turkey.
  • mao zedong established communist rule in china

    mao zedong established communist rule in china
    Mao adopted Marxism–Leninism while working at Peking University and became a founding member of the Communist Party of China (CPC), leading the Autumn Harvest Uprising in 1927. ... On 1 October 1949, Mao Zedong proclaimed the foundation of the People's Republic of China (PRC), a single-party state controlled by the CPC.
  • 22nd amendment

    22nd amendment
    The Twenty-fifth Amendment (Amendment XXV) to the United States Constitution deals with succession to the Presidency and establishes procedures both for filling a vacancy in the office of the Vice President as well as responding to Presidential disabilities.
  • • Marshall Plan

    The Marshall Plan (officially the European Recovery Program, ERP) was an American initiative to aid Western Europe, in which the United States gave over $13 billion (nearly $140 billion in 2017 dollars) in economic assistance to help rebuild Western European economies after the end of World War II.
  • Berlin Airlift

    Berlin Airlift
    The Berlin Airlift: The End of the Blockade. By spring 1949, it was clear that the Soviet blockade of West Berlin had failed. It had not persuaded West Berliners to reject their allies in the West, nor had it prevented the creation of a unified West German state.
  • arab israeli war begins

    arab israeli war begins
    The Arab-Israeli War of 1948 broke out when five Arab nations invaded territory in the former Palestinian mandate immediately following the announcement of the independence of the state of Israel on May 14, 1948. ... The United Nations resolution sparked conflict between Jewish and Arab groups within Palestine.
  • NATO Formed

    NATO Formed
    In 1949, the prospect of further Communist expansion prompted the United States and 11 other Western nations to form the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). The Soviet Union and its affiliated Communist nations in Eastern Europe founded a rival alliance, the Warsaw Pact, in 1955.
  • • Kim Il-sung invades South Korea

    •	Kim Il-sung invades South Korea
    im Il-Sung, original name Kim Song-Ju, (born April 15, 1912, Man’gyŏndae, near P’yŏngyang, Korea [now in North Korea]—died July 8, 1994, P’yŏngyang, North Korea), communist leader of North Korea from 1948 until his death in 1994. He was the country’s premier from 1948 to 1972, chairman of its dominant Korean Workers’ Party from 1949, and president and head of state from 1972.
  • • UN forces push North Korea to Yalu River- the border with China

    •	UN forces push North Korea to Yalu River- the border with China
    North Korean forces quickly retreated back over the 38th parallel and General Douglas MacArthur ordered troops to pursue them into North Korea. On 19 October Pyongyang was captured and by 24 November, North Korean forces were driven back almost to the Yalu River which marks the border of China.
  • • Chinese forces cross Yalu and enter Korean War

    •	Chinese forces cross Yalu and enter Korean War
    The 300,000-man Chinese offensive caught the U.N. forces off guard, largely because of U.S. Gen. Douglas MacArthur's belief that China would not openly enter the war, and vastly expanded the conflict. The Korean War began when communist North Korean forces invaded democratic South Korea on June 25, 1950.
  • Ethel and Julius Rosenberg Execution

    Ethel and Julius Rosenberg Execution
    It was also around this time that he began working as a spy for the Soviet Union. In 1950, he was arrested along with his wife, Ethel Rosenberg, on conspiracy to commit espionage charges. The Rosenbergs were convicted the following year, and were executed on June 19, 1953
  • • Armistice Signed

    •	Armistice Signed
    On Nov. 11, 1918, fighting in World War I came to an end following the signing of an armistice between the Allies and Germany that called for a ceasefire effective at 11 a.m.– it was on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month.
  • hernandez v. texas

    hernandez v. texas
    Hernandez v. Texas. The Court decided that Mexican Americans and all other racial and national groups in the United States had equal protection under the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
  • brown v. board of education

    brown v. board of education
    On May 17, 1954, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren delivered the unanimous ruling in the landmark civil rights case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. State-sanctioned segregation of public schools was a violation of the 14th amendment and was therefore unconstitutional.
  • ho chi minh established communist rule in vietnam

    ho chi minh established communist rule in vietnam
    He helped found the Indochinese Communist Party in 1930 and the League for the Independence of Vietnam, or Viet Minh, in 1941. At World War II's end, Viet Minh forces seized the northern Vietnamese city of Hanoi and declared a Democratic State of Vietnam (or North Vietnam) with Ho as president.
  • • Warsaw Pact Formed

    •	Warsaw Pact Formed
    The Soviet Union formed this alliance as a counterbalance to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), a collective security alliance concluded between the United States, Canada and Western European nations in 1949. The Warsaw Pact supplemented existing agreements
  • polio vaccine

    polio vaccine
    There are two types of vaccine that protect against polio: Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV) and Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV). IPV, used in the United States since 2000, is given as an injection in the leg or arm, depending on age. OPV is taken by mouth. Polio vaccine may be given at the same time as other vaccines.
  • rosa parks arrested

    rosa parks arrested
    On 1 December 1955, Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger on a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama. This single act of nonviolent resistance sparked the Montgomery bus boycott, an eleven-month struggle to desegregate the city's buses.
  • montgomery bus boycott

    montgomery bus boycott
    The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a civil-rights protest during which African Americans refused to ride city buses in Montgomery, Alabama, to protest segregated seating. The boycott took place from December 5, 1955, to December 20, 1956, and is regarded as the first large-scale U.S. demonstration against segregation
  • interstate highway act

    interstate highway act
    The Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. It took several years of wrangling, but a new Federal-Aid Highway Act passed in June 1956. The law authorized the construction of a 41,000-mile network of interstate highways that would span the nation.
  • elvis presley first hit song

    elvis presley first hit song
    February 1956. As "Heartbreak Hotel" makes its climb up the charts on its way to #1, "I Forgot to Remember to Forget" b/w "Mystery Train," Elvis' fifth and last single to be released on the Sun label, hits #1 on Billboard's national country singles chart. His first #1 hit on a national chart.
  • Sputnik I

    Sputnik I
    'In Russian, the word sputnik means a travelling companion.' 'The first sputnik and Yuriy Gagarin's flight on April 12, 1961 made this country a great space power.' 'Ever since the Soviets launched sputnik in 1957, satellites have been part of our consciousness.
  • leave it to beaver first airs on tv

    leave it to beaver first airs on tv
  • civil rights act of 1957

    civil rights act of 1957
    The result was the Civil Rights Act of 1957, the first civil rights legislation since Reconstruction. The new act established the Civil Rights Section of the Justice Department and empowered federal prosecutors to obtain court injunctions against interference with the right to vote.
  • little rock nine

    little rock nine
    The Little Rock Nine was a group of nine African American students enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957. Their enrollment was followed by the Little Rock Crisis, in which the students were initially prevented from entering the racially segregated school by Orval Faubus, the Governor of Arkansas.
  • chicano mural movement begins

    chicano mural movement begins
    The Chicano mural movement began in the 1960s in Mexican-American barrios throughout the Southwest. Artists began using the walls of city buildings, housing projects, schools, and churches to depict Mexican-American culture.
  • kennedy vs nixon tv debate

    kennedy vs nixon tv debate
    The United States presidential election of 1960 was the 44th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 1960. In a closely contested election, Democrat John F. Kennedy defeated incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon, the Republican Party nominee.
  • bay of pigs invasion

    bay of pigs invasion
    On April 17, 1961, 1400 Cuban exiles launched what became a botched invasion at the Bay of Pigs on the south coast of Cuba. In 1959, Fidel Castro came to power in an armed revolt that overthrew Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista.
  • peace corp formed

    peace corp formed
    he Peace Corps is a significant commitment, requiring three months of training in your host country, followed by two years of service at your permanent site. You accrue two days off for every month you work, but the Peace Corps will not pay for your travels.
  • mapp v. ohio

    mapp v. ohio
    Mapp v. Ohio, 367 U.S. 643 (1961), was a landmark case in criminal procedure, in which the United States Supreme Court decided that evidence obtained in violation of the Fourth Amendment, which protects against "unreasonable searches and seizures," may not be used in state law criminal prosecutions in state courts, as ...
  • affirmative action

    affirmative action
    an action or policy favoring those who tend to suffer from discrimination, especially in relation to employment or education; positive discrimination
  • cuban missile crisis

    cuban missile crisis
    The Cuban Missile Crisis was a pivotal moment in the Cold War. Fifty years ago the United States and the Soviet Union stood closer to Armageddon than at any other moment in history. In October 1962 President John F. Kennedy was informed of a U-2 spy-plane's discovery of Soviet nuclear-tipped missiles in Cuba.
  • sam walton opens first walmart

    sam walton opens first walmart
    Image result for sam walton opened first walmart
    On July 2, 1962, Sam Walton opens the first Walmart store in Rogers, Arkansas. The Walton family owns 24 stores, ringing up $12.7 million in sales. The company officially incorporates as Wal-Mart Stores, Inc
  • kennedy assasinated in dallas texas

    kennedy assasinated in dallas texas
    ohn F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, was assassinated on Friday, November 22, 1963, at 12:30 p.m. in Dallas, Texas while riding in a presidential motorcade in Dealey Plaza.
  • gideon v.wainwright

    gideon v.wainwright
    Monday marks the 50th anniversary of Gideon v. Wainwright, a landmark case in U.S. Supreme Court history, in which the court unanimously declared that indigent criminal defendants have a constitutional right to a court-appointed lawyer
  • goerge wallace blocks university of alabama entrance

    goerge wallace blocks university of alabama entrance
    When African American students attempted to desegregate the University of Alabama in June 1963, Alabama's new governor, flanked by state troopers, literally blocked the door of the enrollment office
  • the feminine mystique

    the feminine mystique
    The Feminine Mystique is a book written by Betty Friedan which is widely credited with sparking the beginning of second-wave feminism in the United States. It was published on February 19, 1963 by W. W. Norton.
  • march on washington

    march on  washington
    This program listed the events scheduled at the Lincoln Memorial during the August 28, 1963, March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The highlight of the march, which attracted 250,000 people, was Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech.
    Our Documents - Official Program for the March on Washingt
  • the great society

    the great society
    The Great Society was a set of domestic programs in the United States launched by Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964–65. The main goal was the elimination of poverty and racial injustice.
  • escobedo v. illinois

    escobedo v. illinois
    The Escobedo v. Illinois case was decided on June 22nd, 1964. The Supreme Court, in Escobedo v. Illinois, ruled in favor of Danny Escobedo. ... The verdict explained that the police department targeted Escobedo like he was the murderer and not as a suspect or a witness to the incident.
  • gulf of tonkin resolution

    gulf of tonkin resolution
    The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution or the Southeast Asia Resolution, Pub.L. 88–408, 78 Stat. 384, enacted August 10, 1964, was a joint resolution that the United States Congress passed on August 7, 1964, in response to the Gulf of Tonkin incident.
    Gulf of Tonkin Resolution - Wikipedia
  • civil rights act of 1964

    civil rights act of 1964
    The Civil Rights Act of 1964, which ended segregation in public places and banned employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, is considered one of the crowning legislative achievements of the civil rights movement.
  • 24th amendment

    24th amendment
    Not long ago, citizens in some states had to pay a fee to vote in a national election. This fee was called a poll tax. On January 23, 1964, the United States ratified the 24th Amendment to the Constitution, prohibiting any poll tax in elections for federal officials
  • israeli palestine conflict begins

    israeli palestine conflict begins
    This article is about the ongoing struggle between Israelis and Palestinians that began in the mid-20th century. For the conflict in 1920-1948 British Palestine, see Intercommunal conflict in Mandatory Palestine. For the wider regional conflict, primarily from 1948-73 but extending in more limited manner to 2006, see Arab–Israeli conflict.
  • voting rights act of 1965

    voting rights act of 1965
    he Voting Rights Act of 1965, signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson, aimed to overcome legal barriers at the state and local levels that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote as guaranteed under the 15th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
  • malcom x assassinated

    malcom x assassinated
    On February 21, 1965, he was assassinated by three members of the Nation of Islam.
  • united farm workers california delano grape strike

    united farm workers california delano grape strike
    The Delano grape strike was a labor strike by the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee and the United Farm Workers against grape growers in California. The strike began on September 8, 1965, and lasted more than five years. Due largely to a consumer
  • miranda v. arizona

    Miranda v. Arizona. The Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination requires law enforcement officials to advise a suspect interrogated in custody of his or her rights to remain silent and to obtain an attorney. Supreme Court of Arizona reversed and remanded.
  • thurgood marshall appointed to supreme court

    thurgood marshall appointed to supreme court
    In 1961, President John F. Kennedy appointed Marshall to United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Four years later, President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed Marshall as the United States Solicitor General. In 1967, Johnson successfully nominated Marshall to succeed retiring Associate Justice Tom C. Clark.
  • six day war

    six day war
    The Egyptian, Syrian and Jordanian armies were decisively defeated, and Israel captured the West Bank from Jordan, the Gaza Strip and the Sinai Peninsula from Egypt, and the Golan Heights from Syria. The 1967 war, which lasted only six days, established Israel as the dominant regional military power
  • six day war

    six day war
    An Egyptian plot in 1967 to destroy Israel backfired when Israel struck first, destroying the forces of Egypt, Jordan, and Syria, and taking possession of new territory. The Six-Day War also cemented Israeli, pan-Arab, and Palestinian nationalism.
  • tet offensive

    In late January, 1968, during the lunar new year (or “Tet”) holiday, North Vietnamese and communist Viet Cong forces launched a coordinated attack against a number of targets in South Vietnam. ... The Tet Offens
  • my lai massacre

    my lai massacre
    The My Lai Massacre stemmed from previous events in the Vietnam War. ... Lieutenant William Calley led the Americal Division into My Lai on March 16 and ordered his men to eliminate all suspected members of the NLF.
  • martin luther king jr. assassinated

    April 4, 1968
  • tinker v. des moines

    tinker v. des moines
    In December 1965, a group of students in Des Moines held a meeting in the home of 16-year-old Christopher Eckhardt to plan a public showing of their support for a truce in the Vietnam war. They decided to wear black armbands throughout the holiday season and to fast on December 16 and New Year's Eve. The principals of the Des Moines school learned of the plan and met on December 14 to create a policy that stated that any student wearing an armband would be asked to remove
  • vietnamization

    vietnamization
    in the Vietnam War) the US policy of withdrawing its troops and transferring the responsibility and direction of the war effort to the government of South Vietnam.
  • music stock festival

    music stock festival
    The Woodstock Music & Art Fair—informally, the Woodstock Festival or simply Woodstock— was a music festival in the United States in 1969 which attracted an audience of more than 400,000. Scheduled for August 15–17 on a dairy farm in the Catskill Mountains of southern New York State, northwest of New York City, it ran over to Monday, August 18.[2][3][4][5]
  • draft lottery

    draft lottery
    On December 1, 1969, the Selective Service System of the United States conducted two lotteries to determine the order of call to military service in the Vietnam War for men born from 1944 to 1950. These lotteries occurred during a period of conscription from just before World War II to 1973. It was the first time a lottery system had been used to select men for military service since 1942.
  • manson family murders

    manson family murders
    The Manson Family was a commune established in California in the late 1960s, led by Charles Manson. They gained national notoriety after the murder of actress Sharon Tate and four others on August 9, 1969 by Tex Watson and three other members of the Family, acting under the instructions of Charles Manson
  • apollo 11

    apollo 11
    Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first two humans on the Moon. Mission commander Neil Armstrong and pilot Buzz Aldrin, both American, landed the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969, at 20:18 UTC. Armstrong became the first to step onto the lunar surface six hours after landing on July 21 at 02:56:15 UTC; Aldrin joined him about 20 minutes later.
  • invasion of cambodia

    invasion of cambodia
    The Cambodian Campaign (also known as the Cambodian Incursion and the Cambodian Invasion) was a series of military operations conducted in eastern Cambodia during 1970 by the United States and the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) as an extension of the Vietnam War and the Cambodian Civil War. The invasions were a policy of President Richard Nixon; 13 major operations were
  • kent state shooting

    kent state shooting
    n May 1970, students protesting the bombing of Cambodia by United States military forces, clashed with Ohio National Guardsmen on the Kent State University campus. When the Guardsmen shot and killed four students on May 4, the Kent State Shootings became the focal point of a nation deepl
  • enviromental protection agency (epa)

    enviromental protection agency (epa)
    Born in the wake of elevated concern about environmental pollution, EPA was established on December 2, 1970 to consolidate in one agency a variety of federal research, monitoring, standard-setting and enforcement activities to ensure environmental protection. Since its inception, EPA has been working for a cleaner, healthier environment for the American people
  • pentagon papers

    pentagon papers
    he Pentagon Papers, officially titled United States – Vietnam Relations, 1945–1967: A Study Prepared by the Department of Defense, is a United States Department of Defense history of the United States' political and military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967. The papers were released by Daniel Ellsberg, who had worked on the study; they were first brought to the attention of the public on the front page of The New York Times in 1971.[1][2] A 1996 article in
  • 26th amendment

    26th amendment
    The Twenty-sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from using age as a reason for denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States who are at least eighteen years old. Wikipedia
  • policy of detente begins

    policy of detente begins
    Détente (a French word meaning release from tension) is the name given to a period of improved relations between the United States and the Soviet Union that began tentatively in 1971 and took decisive form when President Richard M. Nixon visited the secretary-general of the Soviet Communist party, Leonid I. Brezhnev, ...
  • title ix

    title ix
    Essentially, Title IX prohibits sex discrimination in educational institutions that receive federal funding (the vast majority of schools). While Title IX is a very short statute, Supreme Court decisions and guidance from the U.S. Department of Education have given it a broad scope covering sexual harassment and sexual violence. Under Title IX, schools are legally required to respond and remedy hostile educational environments and failure to do so is a violation that means a
  • nixon visits china

    nixon visits china
    U.S. President Richard Nixon's 1972 visit to China (officially the People's Republic of China or PRC) was an important strategic and diplomatic overture that marked the culmination of the Nixon administration's rapprochement between the United States and China.
  • watergate scandel

    watergate scandel
    The Watergate scandal was a major political scandal that occurred in the United States during the early 1970s, following a break-in by five men at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. on June 17, 1972, and President Richard Nixon's administration's subsequent attempt to cover up its involvement. After the five burglars were caught and the conspiracy was discover
  • war power resolution

    war power resolution
    The War Powers Resolution (also known as the War Powers Resolution of 1973 or the War Powers Act) (50 U.S.C. 1541–1548) is a federal law intended to check the president's power to commit the United States to an armed conflict without the consent of the U.S. Congress
  • roe v. wade

    roe v. wade
    1971 - The case is filed by Norma McCorvey, known in court documents as Jane ROE against Henry WADE, the district attorney of Dallas County from 1951 to 1987, who enforced a Texas law that prohibited abortion, except to save a woman's life.Apr 23, 2017
  • engaged species act

    engaged species act
    Image result for endangered species actwww.fws.gov
    The Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) was signed on December 28, 1973, and provides for the conservation of species that are endangered or threatened throughout all or a significant portion of their range, and the co
  • engaged species act

    engaged species act
    e Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) was signed on December 28, 1973, and provides for the conservation of species that are endangered or threatened throughout all or a significant portion of their range, and the conservation of the ecosystems on which they depend.Feb 11, 2016
  • epic oil embargo

    epic oil embargo
    he 1973 oil crisis began in October 1973 when the members of the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries proclaimed an oil embargo. The embargo was targeted at nations perceived as supporting Israel during the Yom Kippur War.[1] The initial nations targeted were Canada, Japan, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States with
  • first cell phones

    first cell phones
    Image result for first cell phone
    The world's first mobile phone call was made on April 3, 1973, when Martin Cooper, a senior engineer at Motorola, called a rival telecommunications company and informed them he was speaking via a mobile phone.Mar 6, 2017
  • united states v. nixon

    united states v. nixon
    United States v. Nixon, 418 U.S. 683 (1974), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case which resulted in a unanimous decision against President Richard Nixon, ordering him to deliver tape recordings and other subpoenaed materials to a federal district court.
  • ford parison nixon

    ford parison nixon
    The Watergate scandal was a major political scandal that occurred in the United States during the early 1970s, following a break-in by five men at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. on June 17, 1972, and President Richard Nixon's administration's subsequent attempt to cover up its involvement. After the five burglars were caught and the conspiracy was discovered
  • fall of saigan

    fall of saigan
    The Fall of Saigon[1][2] was the capture of Saigon, the capital of South Vietnam, by the People's Army of Vietnam (PAVN) and the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam (also known as the Việt Cộng) on 30 April 1975. The event marked the end of the Vietnam War
  • bill gates starts microsoft

    bill gates starts microsoft
    Microsoft was founded on April 4, 1975, by Bill Gates and Paul Allen in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
  • national rifle associate (nra) lobbying begins

    national rifle associate (nra) lobbying begins
    AS THE NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION -- NRA, THE KU KLUX KLAN, AND HUNTING PUBLICATIONS) OR FOR THEM (NATIONAL WILDLIFE FEDERATION, THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE) ARE PRESENTED. THE LOBBYING EFFORTS OF
  • steve jobs starts apple

    steve jobs starts apple
    Image result for steve jobs started apple
    In 1976, when Jobs was just 21, he and Steve Wozniak started Apple Computer in the Jobs' family garage.
  • commuunity rienvestment act of 1977

    The Community Reinvestment Act is intended to encourage depository institutions to help meet the credit needs of the communities in which they operate, including low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, consistent with safe and sound operations. ... Comments will be taken into consideration during the next CRA examination.Feb 11, 2014
  • camp david accord

    camp david accord
    On September 17, 1978, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and US President Jimmy Carter signed the Camp David Accords in Washington. The Details of the Camp David Accords: Called for a formal peace treaty to be signed between Israel and Egypt, within three months.
  • egypt israel peace treaty

    egypt israel peace treaty
    The Egypt–Israel Peace Treaty (Arabic: معاهدة السلام المصرية الإسرائيلية‎, Mu`āhadat as-Salām al-Misrīyah al-'Isrā'īlīyah; Hebrew: הסכם השלום בין ישראל למצרים‎, Heskem HaShalom Bein Yisrael LeMitzrayim) was signed in Washington, D.C., United States on 26 March 1979, following the 1978 Camp David Accords. The Egypt–Israel treaty was signed by Egyptian president Anwar Sadat and Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin, and witnessed by United States president Jimmy Carter.[1]
  • conservation resurgence

    conservation resurgence
    CSMVS Art Conservation Resurgence Project supported by Sir Dorabji Tata Trust is a three-year long project initiated in February 2012.
  • trickle down economics

    trickle down economics
    Image result for trickle down economicswww.faireconomy.org
    Trickle-down economics, also referred to as trickle-down theory, is an economic theory that advocates reducing taxes on businesses and the wealthy in society as a means to stimulate business investment in the short term and benefit society at large in the long term.
  • war on drugs

    war on drugs
    War on Drugs is an American term[6][7] usually applied to the U.S. federal government's campaign of prohibition of drugs, military aid, and military intervention, with the stated aim being to reduce the illegal drug trade.[8][9] The initiative includes a set of drug policies that are intended to discourage the production, distribution, and consumption of psychoactive drugs that the participating
  • aids epidemic

    aids epidemic
    This strain was called HIV-1. A second strain, called HIV-2 was discovered; it is presumed to have mutated from SIVsmm, a strain of the Simian virus present naturally in the sooty mangabey, a monkey found primarily along the African coast from Senegal to Ghana. HIV-2 is common in West Africa, but is much rarer in the United States than HIV-1, which is more virulent and progresses more quickly to
  • sandra day o'connor appointed to u.s. supreme court

    sandra day o'connor appointed to u.s. supreme court
    Sandra Day O'Connor (born March 26, 1930) is a retired Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving from her appointment in 1981 by Ronald Reagan to 2006. She was the first woman to serve on the Court.
  • marines in lebanon

    marines in lebanon
    Facts: October 23, 1983 - 241 US service personnel -- including 220 Marines and 21 other service personnel -- are killed by a truck bomb at a Marine compound in Beirut, Lebanon. Three hundred service members had been living at the four-story building at the airport in Beirut.Oct 18, 2017
  • iran contra affair

    iran contra affair
    The Iran–Contra affair (Persian: ماجرای ایران-کنترا‎, Spanish: caso Irán-Contra), also referred to as Irangate,[1] Contragate[2] or the Iran–Contra scandal, was a political scandal in the United States that occurred during the second term of the Reagan Administration. Senior administration officials secretly facilitated the sale of arms to Iran, which was the subject of an arms
  • the oprah winfrey show first airs

    the oprah winfrey show first airs
    The Oprah Winfrey Show, often referred to simply as Oprah, is an American syndicated talk show that aired nationally for 25 seasons from September 8, 1986 to May 25, 2011 in Chicago, Illinois. Produced and hosted by its namesake, Oprah Winfrey, it remains the highest-rated daytime talk show in American television history.[2]
  • mr.gorbachev tear down this wall

    mr.gorbachev tear down this wall
    "Tear down this wall!" is a line from a speech made by US President Ronald Reagan in West Berlin on June 12, 1987, calling for the leader of the Soviet Union, Mikhail Gorbachev, to open up the barrier which had divided West and East Berlin since 1961.[1]
  • end of cold war

    end of cold war
    During 1989 and 1990, the Berlin Wall came down, borders opened, and free elections ousted Communist regimes everywhere in eastern Europe. In late 1991 the Soviet Union itself dissolved into its component republics. With stunning speed, the Iron Curtain was lifted and the Cold War came to an end.
  • berlin walls falls

    berlin walls falls
    The Berlin Wall: The Fall of the Wall. On November 9, 1989, as the Cold War began to thaw across Eastern Europe, the spokesman for East Berlin's Communist Party announced a change in his city's relations with the West. Starting at midnight that day, he said, citizens of the GDR were free to cross the country's borders
  • germany reunification

    germany reunification
    Wednesday, October 3
  • iraq invades kuwait

    iraq invades kuwait
    At about 2 a.m. local time, Iraqi forces invade Kuwait, Iraq’s tiny, oil-rich neighbor. Kuwait’s defense forces were rapidly overwhelmed, and those that were not destroyed retreated to Saudi Arabia. The emir of Kuwait, his family, and other government leaders fled to Saudi Arabia, and within hours Kuwait City had been captured and the Iraqis had established a provincial government. By annexing Kuwait, Iraq gained control of 20 percent of the world’s oil reserves
  • soviet union collapse

    soviet union collapse
    A mid-air collision is an aviation accident in which two or more aircraft come into unplanned contact during flight. Owing to the relatively high velocities involved and the likelihood of subsequent impact with the ground or sea, very severe damage or the total destruction of at least one of the aircraft involved usually results.
  • operation desert storm

    operation desert storm
    Hussein defied United Nations Security Council demands to withdraw from Kuwait by mid-January 1991, and the Persian Gulf War began with a massive U.S.-led air offensive known as Operation Desert Storm. After 42 days of relentless attacks by the allied coalition in the air and on the ground, U.S. President George H.W.
  • ms.adcox born

    ms.adcox born
  • rodney king

    rodney king
    Rodney Glen King (April 2, 1965 – June 17, 2012) was an African-American taxi driver who became known internationally as the victim of Los Angeles Police Department brutality, after a videotape was released of several police officers beating him during his arrest on March 3, 1991. George Holliday, a witness, filmed the incident from his nearby balcony and sent the footage
  • nafta founded

    nafta founded
    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is an agreement signed by Canada, Mexico, and the United States and entered into force on 1 January 1994 in order to establish a trilateral trade bloc in North America.
  • ccontract with america

    ccontract with america
    The 1994 elections resulted in Republicans gaining 54 House and 9 U.S. Senate seats. When the Republicans gained this majority of seats in the 104th Congress, the Contract was seen as a triumph by party leaders such as Minority Whip Newt Gingrich, Dick Armey, and the American conservative movement in genera
  • o.j. simpson's trial of the centuary

    o.j. simpson's trial of the centuary
    Orenthal James "O. J." Simpson (born July 9, 1947), nicknamed The Juice, is a former National Football League (NFL) running back, broadcaster, actor, advertising spokesman, and paroled armed robber and kidnapper. Once a popular figure with the U.S. public, he is most well known
  • bill clinton's impeachment

    bill clinton's impeachment
    The impeachment process of Bill Clinton was initiated by the House of Representatives on December 19, 1998, against Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States, on two charges, one of perjury and one of obstruction of justice
  • juan bday

    juan bday
  • usa patriot act

    usa patriot act
    The USA PATRIOT Act is an Act of Congress that was signed into law by President George W. Bush on October 26, 2001. With its ten-letter abbreviation (USA PATRIOT) expanded, the full title is “Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001”.
  • war on terror

    war on terror
    The War on Terror, also known as the Global War on Terrorism, is an international military campaign that was launched by the U.S. government after the September 11 attacks in the U.S. in 2001
  • 9/11

    9/11
    The September 11 attacks were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda on the United States on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001.
  • nasa mars rover missions begins

    nasa mars rover missions begins
    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity recorded the dawn of the rover's 4,999th Martian day, or sol, with its Panoramic Camera (Pancam) on Feb. 15, 2018, yielding this processed, approximately true-color scene
  • facebook launched

    facebook launched
    February 2004, Cambridge, MA
  • hurricane katrina

    hurricane katrina
    Hurricane Katrina was an extremely destructive and deadly tropical cyclone that is tied with Hurricane Harvey of 2017 as the costliest tropical cyclone on record. Katrina was also one of the costliest natural disasters and one of the five deadliest hurricanes in the history of the United States.[3] As Katrina made
  • saddam hussein executed

    saddam hussein executed
    he execution of Saddam Hussein took place on Saturday, 30 December 2006. Saddam was sentenced to death by hanging, after being convicted of crimes against humanity by the Iraqi Special Tribunal for the murder of 148 Iraqi Shi'ites in the town of Dujail in 1982, in retaliation for an assassination
  • iphone released

    iphone released
    On January 9, 2007, Steve Jobs announced iPhone at the Macworld convention, receiving substantial media attention. Jobs announced that the first iPhone would be released later that year. On June 29, 2007, the first iPhone was released.
  • american recovery and reinvestment act of 2009

    american recovery and reinvestment act of 2009
    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) (Pub.L. 111–5), nicknamed the Recovery Act, was a stimulus package enacted by the 111th U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Barack
  • hilary clinton appointed u.s. secretary of state

    hilary clinton appointed u.s. secretary of state
    Hillary Clinton served as the 67th United States Secretary of State, under President Barack Obama, from 2009 to 2013, overseeing the department that conducted the Foreign policy of Barack Obama. She was preceded in office by Condoleezza Rice, and succeeded by John Kerry
  • sonia sotomayor appointed to u.s. supreme court

    sonia sotomayor appointed to u.s. supreme court
    August 8, 2009
  • arab spring

    arab spring
    The causes of the Arab Spring, or as some call it, Arab Awakening, were many and long-gathering. For decades, Arab populations had faced repression of free speech, human rights abuses, economic mismanagement, corruption and stifling of political dissent.
  • osama bin laden killed

    osama bin laden killed
    Osama bin Laden is a terrorist extremist who planned the attacks on the World Trade Center and is intent on driving Western influence from the Muslim world.Apr 28, 20
  • space x falcon 9

    space x falcon 9
    Falcon Heavy is the most powerful operational rocket in the world by a factor of two. With the ability to lift into orbit nearly 64 metric tons (141,000 lb)---a mass greater than a 737 jetliner loaded with passengers, crew, luggage and fuel--Falcon Heavy can lift more than twice the payload of the next closest operational vehicle, the Delta IV Heavy, at one-third the cost. Falcon Heavy draws upon the proven heritage and relia
  • donald trump elected president

    donald trump elected president
    The inauguration marked the formal culmination of the presidential transition of Donald Trump that began when he won the U.S. presidential election on November 8, 2016 and became the President-elect. Trump and his running mate, Mike Pence, were formally elected by the Electoral College on December 19, 2016.
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    world war 1

    World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918
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    Roaring Twenties

    The Roaring Twenties was the period of Western society and Western culture that occurred during and around the 1920s
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    a long and severe recession in an economy or market
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    : Franklin D. Roosevelt

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    New Deal Programs

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    The Holocaust

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    world war ll

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    Harry S. Truman

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    Baby Boom

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    1950s priosperity

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    Dwight D Eisenhower

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    warren court

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    vietnam war

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    john f kennedy

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    lyndon b johnson

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    richard nixon

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    ronald reagon

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    goerge h. w. bush

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    bill clinton

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    goerge w. bush

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    barack obama

    American politician who served as the 44th President of the United States from 2009 to 2017. The first African American to assume the presidency, he was previously the junior United States Senator from Illinois from 2005 to 2008. He served in the Illinois State Senate from 1997 until 2004.