U.S. History

Timeline created by Gallo pelado
  • Homestead Act

    Homestead Act
    To attract immigrants, the US government UU. decreed in 1862, the Homestead Act , which defines the ownership of a property of 65 hectares to those who grow it for five years.
  • • Transcontinental Railroad Completed

    •	Transcontinental Railroad Completed
    On this day in 1869, the presidents of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railroads meet in Promontory, Utah, and drive a ceremonial last spike into a rail line that connects their railroads. This made transcontinental railroad travel possible for the first time in U.S. history. No longer would western-bound travelers need to take the long and dangerous journey by wagon train, and the West would surely lose some of its wild charm with the new connection to the civilized East.
  • Industrialization Begins to Boom

    Industrialization Begins to Boom
    The Industrial Revolution, which took place from the 18th to 19th centuries, was a period during which predominantly agrarian, rural societies in Europe and America became industrial and urban. Prior to the Industrial Revolution, which began in Britain in the late 1700s, manufacturing was often done in people’s homes, using hand tools or basic machines.
  • • Boss Tweed rise at Tammany Hall

    •	Boss Tweed rise at Tammany Hall
    Tammany Hall was a New York City political organization that endured for nearly two centuries. Formed in 1789 in opposition to the Federalist Party, its leadership often mirrored that of the local Democratic Party’s executive committee. Although its popularity stemmed from a willingness to help the city’s poor and immigrant populations, Tammany Hall became known for charges of corruption levied against leaders such as William M. “Boss” Tweed.
  • • Telephone Invented

    •	Telephone Invented
    Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-born American scientist best known as the inventor of the telephone, worked at a school for the deaf while attempting to invent a machine that would transmit sound by electricity. Bell was granted the first official patent for his telephone in March 1876, though he would later face years of legal challenges to his claim that he was its sole inventor, resulting in one of history’s longest patent battles.
  • • Reconstruction Ends

    •	Reconstruction Ends
    In 1867, the political battle between President Johnson and Congress over southern Reconstruction came to a confrontation. The Radical Republicans in Congress were not content with curbing Johnson’s authority by overriding his vetoes--they wanted to remove him altogether.
  • Light Bulb Invented

    Light Bulb Invented
    The electric light, one of the everyday conveniences that most affects our lives, was not “invented” in the traditional sense in 1879 by Thomas Alva Edison, although he could be said to have created the first commercially practical incandescent light. He was neither the first nor the only person trying to invent an incandescent light bulb. In fact, some historians claim there were over 20 inventors of incandescent lamps prior to Edison’s version.
  • • Third Wave of Immigration

    •	Third Wave of Immigration
    Immigrants came over to America for more job opportunities and freedom of religion. Chinese, Japanese, and other Asian countries (migrated to the western states).Over half of the operatives in steel, meat-packing, and mining were made up of immigrants.
    -In the 1910 census, foreign-born residents made up 15 percent of the U.S. population and 24 percent of the U.S. labor force.
    -By 1914, 1.2 million immigrants had entered the United States.
  • Chinese Exclusion Act

    Chinese Exclusion Act
    The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 was the first significant law restricting immigration into the United States. Those on the West Coast were especially prone to attribute declining wages and economic ills on the despised Chinese workers. Although the Chinese composed only .002 percent of the nation’s population, Congress passed the exclusion act to placate worker demands and assuage prevalent concerns about maintaining white “racial purity.”
  • Pendleton Act

    Pendleton Act
    The Pendleton Act provided that Federal Government jobs be awarded on the basis of merit and that Government employees be selected through competitive exams. The act also made it unlawful to fire or demote for political reasons employees who were covered by the law.
  • • Dawes Act

    •	Dawes Act
    Federal Indian policy during the period from 1870 to 1900 marked a departure from earlier policies that were dominated by removal, treaties, reservations, and even war. The new policy focused specifically on breaking up reservations by granting land allotments to individual Native Americans.
  • Interstate Commerce Act

    Interstate Commerce Act
    In 1887 Congress passed the Interstate Commerce Act, making the railroads the first industry subject to Federal regulation. Congress passed the law largely in response to public demand that railroad operations be regulated.
  • • Andrew Carnegie’s Gospel of Wealth

    •	Andrew Carnegie’s Gospel of Wealth
    The Gospel of Wealth was an article written by Andrew Carnegie in 1889. Carnegie was a Scottish immigrant who became the second richest man in America. By dominating the steel industry, Andrew Carnegie took his place alongside other fabulously wealthy captains of industry like Rockefeller and Vanderbilt. He became convinced that men like him had a responsibility to spend their money to benefit the greater good. This belief became known as the Gospel of Wealth.
  • Chicago's Hull House

    Chicago's Hull House
    Born in Cedarville, Illinois, on September 6, 1860, and graduated from Rockford Female Seminary in 1881, Jane Addams founded, with Ellen Gates Starr, the world famous social settlement Hull-House on Chicago's Near West Side in 1889. From Hull-House, where she lived and worked until her death in 1935, Jane Addams built her reputation as the country's most prominent woman through her writing, settlement work, and international efforts for peace.
  • • Klondike Gold Rush

    •	Klondike Gold Rush
    was a migration by an estimated 100,000 prospectors to the Klondike region of the Yukon in north-western Canada between 1896 and 1899. Gold was discovered there by local miners on August 16, 1896, and, when news reached Seattle and San Francisco the following year, it triggered a stampede of prospectors. Some became wealthy, but the majority went in vain. It has been immortalized in photographs, books, films, and artifacts.
  • Sherman Anti-Trust Act

    Sherman Anti-Trust Act
    The Sherman Anti-Trust Act is landmark 1890 U.S. legislation which outlawed trusts, then understood to mean monopolies and cartels, to increase economic competitiveness.
  • How The Other Half Lives

    How The Other Half Lives
    The recent invention of flash photography made it possible to document the dark, over-crowded tenements, grim saloons and dangerous slums. Riis’s pioneering use of flash photography brought to light even the darkest parts of the city. Used in articles, books, and lectures, his striking compositions became powerful tools for social reform.
  • • Influence of Sea Power Upon History

    •	Influence of Sea Power Upon History
    In 1890 Mahan published his college lectures as The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660–1783. In this book he argued for the paramount importance of sea power in national historical supremacy. The book, which came at a time of great technological improvement in warships,
  • Homestead Steel Labor Strike

    Homestead Steel Labor Strike
    The Homestead strike, in Homestead, Pennsylvania, pitted one of the most powerful new corporations, Carnegie Steel Company, against the nation’s strongest trade union, the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers. An 1889 strike had won the steelworkers a favorable three-year contract; but by 1892 Andrew Carnegie was determined to break the union.
  • Pullman Labor Strike

    Pullman Labor Strike
    The Pullman Strike, as it would come to be called, emerged from one of the country’s most devastating economic crises, the Panic of 1893. Thousands of businesses shut down, and unemployment cracked 20%. To cope with plummeting demand and revenue, the Pullman Company, a premier railroad manufacturer, slashed its workforce by half and worker wages by a quarter, financially crippling its employees and their families under the weight of unsubsidized rents and living expenses.
  • • Annexation of Hawaii

    •	Annexation of Hawaii
    On the Hawaiian Islands, a group of American sugar planters under Sanford Ballard Dole overthrow Queen Liliuokalani, the Hawaiian monarch, and establish a new provincial government with Dole as president. The coup occurred with the foreknowledge of John L. Stevens, the U.S. minister to Hawaii, and 300 U.S. Marines from the U.S. cruiser Boston were called to Hawaii, allegedly to protect American lives.
  • • Spanish American War

    •	Spanish American War
    The Spanish-American War (1898) was a conflict between the United States and Spain that ended Spanish colonial rule in the Americas and resulted in U.S. acquisition of territories in the western Pacific and Latin America.
  • • Open Door Policy

    •	Open Door Policy
    statement of principles initiated by the United States in 1899 and 1900 for the protection of equal privileges among countries trading with China and in support of Chinese territorial and administrative integrity. The statement was issued in the form of circular notes dispatched by U.S. Secretary of State John Hay to Great Britain, Germany, France, Italy, Japan, and Russia.
  • Assassination of President Mckinley

    Assassination of President Mckinley
    William McKinley was the 25th President of the United States from March 4, 1897 until his assassination in September 1901, six months into his second term.
  • • Panama Canal U.S. Construction Begins

    •	Panama Canal U.S. Construction Begins
    Following the failure of a French construction team in the 1880s, the United States commenced building a canal across a 50-mile stretch of the Panama isthmus in 1904. Opened in 1914, oversight of the world-famous Panama Canal was transferred from the U.S. to Panama in 1999.
  • The Jungle

    The Jungle
    Upton Sinclair wrote The Jungle to expose the appalling working conditions in the meat-packing industry. His description of diseased, rotten, and contaminated meat shocked the public and led to new federal food safety laws.
  • Pure Food And Drug

    Pure Food And Drug
    On this date, the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 (PL 59-384) passed in the U.S. House of Representatives, 240 to 17. Muckraking journalists had long reported on the appallingly unsanitary conditions of the country’s manufacturing plants, especially those in Chicago’s meat-packing industry.
  • Model-T

    Model-T
    The Model T, also known as the “Tin Lizzie,” changed the way Americans live, work and travel. Henry Ford’s revolutionary advancements in assembly-line automobile manufacturing made the Model T the first car to be affordable for a majority of Americans.
  • NAACP

    NAACP
    NAACP Forward will guide our commitment to advancing civil rights through the present political climate and century ahead. In towns and cities nationwide, NAACP Forward will engage communities, members, supporters, partners and allies to confront the threats that citizens face each day, from voter suppression to income inequality to biased law enforcement.
  • 16th Amendment

    16th Amendment
    allows the Congress to levy an income tax without apportioning it among the states or basing it on the United States Census.
  • Federal Reserve Act

    Federal Reserve Act
    The Federal Reserve Act of 1913 established the Federal Reserve System as the central bank of the United States to provide the nation with a safer, more flexible, and more stable monetary and financial system.
  • 17th Amendment

    17th Amendment
    Senators voted on by the people
  • Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

    Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand
    n an event that is widely acknowledged to have sparked the outbreak of World War I, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, nephew of Emperor Franz Josef and heir to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, is shot to death along with his wife by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo, Bosnia, on this day in 1914.
  • Trench Warfare. Poison Gas, and Machine Guns

    Trench Warfare. Poison Gas, and Machine Guns
    Poison gas was probably the most feared of all weapons in World War One. Poison gas was indiscriminate and could be used on the trenches even when no attack was going on. Whereas the machine gun killed more soldiers overall during the war, death was frequently instant or not drawn out and soldiers could find some shelter in bomb/shell craters from gunfire.
  • Sinking of the Lusitania

    Sinking of the Lusitania
    The sinking of the RMS Lusitania , which occurred off the coast of Ireland on May 7, 1915 due to the attack of a German submarine, was one of the greatest naval disasters to have occurred to a line ship during the First World War.
  • National Parks System

    National Parks System
    The National Park Service (NPS) is an agency of the United States federal government that manages all national parks, many national monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations.
  • Zimmerman Telegram

    Zimmerman Telegram
    In January 1917, British cryptographers deciphered a telegram from German Foreign Minister Arthur Zimmermann to the German Minister to Mexico, von Eckhardt, offering United States territory to Mexico in return for joining the German cause. This message helped draw the United States into the war and thus changed the course of history.
  • Russian Revolution

    Russian Revolution
    The Russian Revolution of 1917 was one of the most explosive political events of the twentieth century. The violent revolution marked the end of the Romanov dynasty and centuries of Russian Imperial rule. During the Russian Revolution, the Bolsheviks, led by leftist revolutionary Vladimir Lenin, seized power and destroyed the tradition of csarist rule. The Bolsheviks would later become the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.
  • U.S. entry into WWI

    U.S. entry into WWI
    When World War I broke out across Europe in 1914, President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed the United States would remain neutral, and many Americans supported this policy of nonintervention. However, public opinion about neutrality started to change after the sinking of the British ocean liner Lusitania by a German U-boat in 1915; almost 2,000 people perished, including 128 Americans.
  • 18th Amendment

    18th Amendment
    declaring the production, transport, and sale of alcohol illegal.
  • 19th Amendment

    19th Amendment
    Woman Suffrage
  • President Harding's Return to Normalcy

    President Harding's Return to Normalcy
    The 29th U.S. president, Warren Harding (1865-1923) served in office from 1921 to 1923 before dying of an apparent heart attack. Harding’s presidency was overshadowed by the criminal activities of some of his cabinet members and other government officials, although he himself was not involved in any wrongdoing.
  • • Harlem Renaissance

    •	Harlem Renaissance
    The Harlem Renaissance was the development of the Harlem neighborhood in New York City as a black cultural mecca in the early 20th Century and the subsequent social and artistic explosion that resulted. Lasting roughly from the 1910s through the mid-1930s, the period is considered a golden age in African American culture, manifesting in literature, music, stage performance and art.
  • • Red Scare

    •	Red Scare
    As the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States intensified in the late 1940s and early 1950s, hysteria over the perceived threat posed by Communists in the U.S. became known as the Red Scare. (Communists were often referred to as “Reds” for their allegiance to the red Soviet flag.) The Red Scare led to a range of actions that had a profound and enduring effect on U.S. government and society.
  • • Teapot Dome Scandal

    •	Teapot Dome Scandal
    The Teapot Dome Scandal of the 1920s shocked Americans by revealing an unprecedented level of greed and corruption within a presidential administration. The scandal involved ornery oil tycoons, poker-playing politicians, illegal liquor sales, a murder-suicide, a womanizing president and a bagful of bribery cash delivered on the sly.
  • • Joseph Stalin Leads USSR

    •	Joseph Stalin Leads USSR
    Joseph Stalin (1878-1953) was the dictator of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) from 1929 to 1953. Under Stalin, the Soviet Union was transformed from a peasant society into an industrial and military superpower. However, he ruled by terror, and millions of his own citizens died during his brutal reign. Born into poverty, Stalin became involved in revolutionary politics, as well as criminal activities, as a young man.
  • • Scopes “Monkey” Trial

    •	Scopes “Monkey” Trial
    In Dayton, Tennessee, the so-called “Monkey Trial” begins with John Thomas Scopes, a young high school science teacher, accused of teaching evolution in violation of a Tennessee state law. The law, which had been passed in March, made it a misdemeanor punishable by fine to “teach any theory that denies the story of the Divine Creation of man as taught in the Bible, and to teach instead that man has descended from a lower order of animals.”
  • • Mein Kampf published

    •	Mein Kampf published
    Seven months after being released from Landsberg jail, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler publishes the first volume of his personal manifesto, Mein Kampf. Dictated by Hitler during his nine-month stay in prison, Mein Kampf, or “My Struggle,” was a bitter and turgid narrative filled with anti-Semitic outpourings, disdain for morality, worship of power, and the blueprints for his plan of Nazi world domination.
  • • Charles Lindbergh’s Trans-Atlantic Flight

    •	Charles Lindbergh’s Trans-Atlantic Flight
    7:52am - Charles Lindbergh takes off from Roosevelt Field, Long Island, New York. The heavy plane, loaded with 450 gallons of fuel, clears telephone wires at the end of the runway by only 20 feet.
  • • St. Valentine’s Day Massacre

    •	St. Valentine’s Day Massacre
    Gang warfare ruled the streets of Chicago during the late 1920s, as chief gangster Al Capone sought to consolidate control by eliminating his rivals in the illegal trades of bootlegging, gambling and prostitution. This rash of gang violence reached its bloody climax in a garage on the city’s North Side on February 14, 1929, when seven men associated with the Irish gangster George “Bugs” Moran, one of Capone’s longtime enemies, were shot to death by several men dressed as policemen.
  • • Stock Market Crashes “Black Tuesday”

    •	Stock Market Crashes “Black Tuesday”
    Black Tuesday hits Wall Street as investors trade 16,410,030 shares on the New York Stock Exchange in a single day. Billions of dollars were lost, wiping out thousands of investors, and stock tickers ran hours behind because the machinery could not handle the tremendous volume of trading. In the aftermath of Black Tuesday, America and the rest of the industrialized world spiraled downward into the Great Depression.
  • • Hoovervilles

    •	Hoovervilles
    Hooverville was the name by which the irregular settlements built by the homeless during the Great Depression in the United States were known. They have this name because the President of the United States at the time was Herbert Hoover and, supposedly, let the country fall into recession.
  • • Smoot-Hawley Tariff

    •	Smoot-Hawley Tariff
    Few areas of historical research have provoked such intensive study as the origins of America’s Great Depression. From 1929 to 1933 America suffered the worst economic decline in its history. Real national income fell by 36 percent; unemployment increased from 3 percent to over 25 percent; more than 40 percent of all banks were permanently closed; and international investment and trade declined dramatically.
  • • 100, 000 Banks Have Failed

    •	100, 000 Banks Have Failed
    As the economic depression deepened in the early 30s, and as farmers had less and less money to spend in town, banks began to fail at alarming rates. During the 20s, there was an average of 70 banks failing each year nationally. After the crash during the first 10 months of 1930, 744 banks failed – 10 times as many. In all, 9,000 banks failed during the decade of the 30s. It's estimated that 4,000 banks failed during the one year of 1933 alone.
  • • Agriculture Adjustment Administration (AAA)

  • • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)

  • • Public Works Administration (PWA)

  • • Hitler appointed Chancellor of Germany

  • • Dust Bowl

  • • Social Security Administration (SSA)

  • • Rape of Nanjing

  • • Kristallnacht

  • • Hitler invades Poland

  • • German Blitzkrieg attacks

  • • Tuskegee Airmen

  • • Navajo Code Talkers

  • • Pearl Harbor

  • • Executive Order 9066

  • • Bataan Death March

  • • Invasion of Normandy (D-Day)

  • • Atomic bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima

  • • Victory over Japan/Pacific (VJ/VP) Day

  • • Liberation of Concentration Camps

  • • Victory in Europe (VE) Day

  • • Nuremberg Trials

  • Period: to

    Gilded Age

    The term was coined by the writer Mark Twain in The Gilded Age : A Tale of Today, of 1873, that satirizaba an era of serious social problems, masked by a thin layer of gold
  • Period: to

    Progressive Era

    Progressivism refers to the different responses to the economic and social evolutions that occurred as a result of America’s rapid urbanization and industrialization at the end of the 19th century. In the late 1800s, millions of Americans migrated west and into urban areas, and hundreds of thousands of African Americans moved to northern cities.
  • Period: to

    Imperialism

    a situation in which one country has a lot of power or influence over others, especially in political and economic matters: She accused the United States of economic imperialism.
  • Period: to

    Theodore Roosevelt

    Political Parties:Republican and Progressive (Bull Moose) Party
    Domestic Policy:Square Deal (3C's) ,Trust Busting Consumers, Conservation(nature)
  • Period: to

    William Howard Taft

    Political Parties:Republican
    Domestic Policy: 3C's 16/17 amendments
  • Period: to

    Woodrow Wilson

    Political Parties:Democrat
    Domestic Policy:Clayton Anti-Trust Act, National Park Service, Federal reserve Act, 18/19 amendments
  • Period: to

    World War I

  • Period: to

    Roaring Twenties

  • Period: to

    Great Depression

  • Period: to

    Franklin D. Roosevelt

  • Period: to

    : New Deal Programs

  • Period: to

    The Holocaust

  • Period: to

    World War II

  • Period: to

    Harry S. Truman