The Evolution of the Clock

Timeline created by zsterling13
  • 100

    The Sun Dial

    The Sun Dial
    The sun dial was the very first device mankind used to tell time. The Egyptians were the first to create and use this device. They uinvented it at about 3500 BC. The sun dial worked by creating a shadow from the sun that was used to line up with a line written with a certain time of day. Sun dials were always made out of some type of hard material. Most oftenly stone and rock.
  • 100

    The Sun Dial Cont.

    The Sun Dial Cont.
    Stern, D. P. (2007, January 3). (2a)Â Â The Sundial. The Sundial. Retrieved October 4, 2012, from http://www-istp.gsfc.nasa.gov/stargaze/Sundial.htm
  • 328

    The Water Clock

    The Water Clock
    Invented by the Persians in 328 AD, the water clock is a type of device that involves water pouring into or out of a bowl through a small hole constantly. The time the water constantly travels is then measured to be put into time. The most common type of water clock was having the water of in one bowl empty out into something that would catch the water. The most common example of this is another bowl catching the water until it overflowed;however, the are some examples that show other ways.
  • 328

    The Water Clock Cont.

    The Water Clock Cont.
    One way was of having a wooden bowl float in a well with the water draining out. The water clock was used much more than the sun dile because of how everyone had to have water. So since everyone had water they could easily measure the time by using the water. The History of Sun Clocks and Water Clocks - Obelisks. (n.d.). The History of Sun Clocks and Water Clocks - Obelisks. Retrieved October 4, 2012, from http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa071401a.htm
  • 520

    The Candle Clock

    The Candle Clock
    Invented by the Chinese in 520 AD, a candle clock works by having either a wax candle or a stick of incense starting at a certain height and melts to a lower height. This tells how long it has been since it has been lit by measuring its height. These there are examples of how people used a frame, like in the picture, to measure the height of the candle, or they would have the height written in the wax.
  • 520

    The Candle Clock Cont.

    The Candle Clock Cont.
    The candle clock method was not very efficient though. There are many different types of waxes and incenses, and they do not all melt at the same rate. Because of this candle clocks were not very popular for tracking time. Warber, A. (2009, February 28). Candle Clocks. Suite101.com. Retrieved October 4, 2012, from http://suite101.com/article/candle-clocks-a99480
  • Jan 1, 1285

    The Weight Clock

    The Weight Clock
    Invented in Europe, the weight clock was the first mechanical clock ever created. It invovled having weights to use the force of gravity to help turn gears in the clock. They only had an hour hand that was used, and it would strike bells to help tell the time. The first public one appeared around 1335 A.D. in Milan, Italy. These first mechanical clocks were not very accurate, but they were still thought to be accurate at the time of their invention.
  • Jan 1, 1285

    The Weight Clock Cont.

    The Weight Clock Cont.
    Cummings, E. (n.d.). Clock a History - Timekeepers. Clock a History - Timekeepers. Retrieved October 9, 2012, from http://www.timekeepingsite.org/clock.htm
  • Jan 1, 1338

    The Hour Glass

    The Hour Glass
    Invented in France in 1338, the hourglass involves an amount of fine sand pouring through a small hole constantly in a certain amount of time. The sand was contained in a glass jar like object in the shape of an eight. This was one of the most popular methods of telling time that did not invovle any mechanical parts. It is easy to transport due to its size and how it contains the fine sand, unlike previous candles with dripping wax, spilling water, and heavy sun dials made of stone.
  • Jan 1, 1338

    The Hour Glass Cont.

    The Hour Glass Cont.
    Young, T. (2007, July 27). Hourglass History. Hourglass. Retrieved October 4, 2012, from http://tkyoung.com/history.html
  • Jan 1, 1510

    The Spring-driven Clock

    The Spring-driven Clock
    The spring-driven clock, built in 1510, was the first successful mechanical clock. It was originally constructed by Peter Henlein, a German engineer. There were ealier versions of a mechanical clock; however, none were as successful as Henlein's. This also the first portable clock, and it later turned into the first watch by having a piece of string tied around the wrist.
  • Jan 1, 1510

    The Spring-Driven Clock Cont.

    The Spring-Driven Clock Cont.
    The History of Timekeeping. (n.d.). Untitled Document. Retrieved October 5, 2012, from http://www.elytradesign.com/ari/html/springdrivenclock.htm
  • The Cuckoo Clock

    The Cuckoo Clock
    The cuckoo clock, invented by Mr Franz Kettler in Germany in 1630, was the first mechanical clock that could display time and create a sound at a certain time. Cuckooclock World, the world of cuckoo clocks. (n.d.). Cuckooclock World, the World of Cuckoo Clocks. Retrieved October 5, 2012, from http://www.cuckooclockworld.com/history.htm
  • The Pendulum Clock

    The Pendulum Clock
    The pendulum clock, invented by Christiaan Hygens in 1656, is a clock that is powered by a swinging pendulum to keep time. Infoplease. (n.d.). Retrieved October 5, 2012, from http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0855495.html
  • The Quartz Clock

    The Quartz Clock
    The quartz clock, invented by Warren A Marrison in 1927, is the type of analog clock used in the modern age. It works by having a battery to send electric currents through a coil to cause a vibration. This vibration causes a magnet to change the frequencies so a small pin moves along a small quartz crystal to harness the extreme vibrations of the crystal into moving gears and other mechanical parts. The quartz clock is also the most common type of clock used for time keeping.
  • The Quartz Clock Cont.

    The Quartz Clock Cont.
    The quartz clock is still the most commonly used clock of the public. It is still used in watches, timers, computers, and almsot every device of the modern age. The History of Timekeeping. (n.d.). Untitled Document. Retrieved October 6, 2012, from http://www.elytradesign.com/ari/html/quartzclock.htm
  • The Atomic Clock

    The Atomic Clock
    The atomic clock was invented in England from the production of many scientists in 1949. It was a type of clock that used electromagnetic waves to track the time unlike the standard analog clock. It works by sending electromagnetic waves to cesium atoms. When they interact the atom vibrates, giving off a the same amount of vibrations for every second. It is far too dangerous to use in public due to its radiation, but it is still used for science and business due to how accurate it is.
  • The Atomic Clock Cont.

    The Atomic Clock Cont.
    The History of Atomic clocks, Pendulum clocks, Water and Sun Dial clocks, time. (n.d.). The History of Atomic Clocks, Pendulum Clocks, Water and Sun Dial Clocks, Time. Retrieved October 6, 2012, from
  • Period:
    100
    to

    The life span of time telling

  • Period:
    100
    to
    328

    The Age of the Sun Dial

  • Period:
    329
    to
    520

    The Age of the Water Clock

  • Period:
    521
    to
    Jan 1, 1285

    The Age of the Candle Clock

  • Period:
    Jan 1, 1286
    to
    Jan 1, 1338

    The Age of the Weight Clock

  • Period:
    Jan 1, 1339
    to
    Jan 1, 1510

    The Age of the Hour Glass

  • Period:
    Jan 1, 1511
    to

    The Age of the Spring-Driven Clock

  • Period: to

    The Age of the Cuckoo Clock

  • Period: to

    The Age of the Pendulum Clock

  • Period: to

    The Age of the Quartz Clock

  • Period: to

    The Age of the Atomic Clock