Edward Hopper

Timeline created by micaelad
  • Edward Hopper was born

    Edward Hopper was born in 1882, in NY, into a middle class family
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    Studied at the NY School Of Art

    From 1900 to 1906 he studied at the NY School of Art, and while in school, shifted from illustration to works of fine art. Upon completing his schooling, he worked as an illustrator for a short period of time
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    Made three trips to Europe

    He made three trips to Europe between 1906 and 1910. In retrospect, Europe meant France, and more specifically, Paris, for Edward Hopper. This city , its architecture, light, and art tradition, decisively affected his development.
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    Returned back to United States, never to leave again

    In 1910 Hopper returned to the United States, never to leave North America again. During the 1910s, Edward Hopper struggled quite a bit to gain any recognition for the works he had created.
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    Received an Art Invitation

    At the age of 37, Edward Hopper received his first open invitation to do a one person exhibit, featuring some of this finest pieces of art
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    Second Exhibit

    A few years later, Edward Hopper found his career had taken a turn for the better, and he was doing well in sales, and financially with the works he had created. He was invited to do a second one person exhibit, to feature new works, and to create a buzz about the work he had created in recent years
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    In 1923, Edward Hopper married a fellow student who attended the NY Academy where he got his education, Josephine Nivision
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    In 1933, Edward Hopper received further praises for the works he had done, and for a piece that was on exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art
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    In Edward Hopper's most famous piece, Nighthawks, there are four customers and a waiter, who are in a brightly lit diner at night. It was a piece created during a wartime; and many believe that their disconnect with the waiter, and with the external world, represent the feelings of many Americans during this period, because of the war. The piece was set up in 1942, in the Art Institute of Chicago, and was seen by many people while it was on exhibit for a show
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    Rest In Peace Hopper

    Hopper never lacked popular appeal, however, and by the time of his death in 1967, Hopper had been reclaimed as a major influence by a new generation of American realist artists.