Disruption Timeline- Catherine Blackburn

Timeline created by facebooker_1890530134301625
  • EGYPTIAN REVOLUTION

    EGYPTIAN REVOLUTION
    Often called the"Facebook Revolution." Khaled Mohamed Saeed, an Egyptian man died was beaten to death by police. Photos of his corpse spread throughout social media and the Internet. A Facebook page was created by a Google Ex, called, "We are all Khaled Said" to bring attention to his death leading to the Egyptian Revolution of 2011. Information was desseminated through Facebook in an effort to share political views and discontent.
  • ARAB SPRINGS

    ARAB SPRINGS
    Mohamed Bouazizi protesting the oppression of officials and government to earn a living set himself on fire. Public images were shared on social media. Facebook was used to establish protests, Twitter to coordinate, and YouTube to tell the world.
  • CHINA SOCIAL REVOLUTION

    CHINA SOCIAL REVOLUTION
    In July of 2011, a high-speed train crashed became an opportunistic time for social media to draw attention to government corruption and capitalism. The Chinese blogosphere and Weibo (Chinese Twitter) shared photos of government coverups and lack of responsibility in the tragic crash. Photos of the burned wreckage and accounts are given by victims and their families through the unofficial press were virtually and instantaneously shared. (photo of social media message to their gov.)
  • VENEZUELA REVOLUtION

    VENEZUELA REVOLUtION
    Economic conditions in Venezuela are at a crisis level due to oil prices dropping, hyperinflation, and borrowed debt. An agreement made by Chavez in 2013 left basic needs such as food and medical supplies as an import. The misery index is the highest in the world. Twitter is a platform for protests and hashtags support political demonstrations. Facebook & Twitter are social media forms used due to 42% of the country being online with 31% owning a smartphone.
  • UKRAINE REVOLUTION

    UKRAINE REVOLUTION
    Also known as #euromaidan. Political unrest in anti-government deomonstrations in Kiev created a clash between protestors and police which left 82 people dead, and more than 1,000 injured. Facebook was used to map our where supplies where needed and how to build Molotov Cocktails, where to ask for help and to organize action. It was the number one social platform followed by VKontakte (news site), and Twitter where hashtags tagged flagged groups seeking information and bringing awareness