Chapter 25 - America Moves to the City (1865-1900)

Timeline created by rebeccahettrick
In History
  • Charles Darwin publishes, On the Origin of Species

    Charles Darwin publishes, On the Origin of Species
    On the Origin of Species, published on 24 November 1859, is a work of scientific literature by Charles Darwin which is considered to be the foundation of evolutionary biology. Darwin's book introduced the scientific theory that populations evolve over the course of generations through a process of natural selection. It presented a body of evidence that the diversity of life arose by common descent through a branching pattern of evolution.
  • Morrill Act provides public land for higher education

    Morrill Act provides public land for higher education
    The Morrill Act was first proposed in 1857, and was passed by Congress in 1859, but it was vetoed by President James Buchanan. In 1861, Morrill resubmitted the act with the amendment that the proposed institutions would teach military tactics as well as engineering and agriculture. Aided by the secession of many states that did not support the plans, this reconfigured Morrill Act was signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln on July 2, 1862.
  • Wyoming territory grants women the right to vote

    Wyoming territory grants women the right to vote
    1870

    This was an act granting the women of Wyoming the right of suffrage
    - in the west, women were seen as equals because they did just as much work.
  • Woodhull and Claflin's Weekly published

    Woodhull and Claflin's Weekly published
    The newspaper was known for publishing controversial writings on topics such as sex education, free love, women's suffrage, short skirts, and licensed prostitution. More recently, the paper has earned it's reputation for printing the first English version of Communist Manifesto written by Karl Marx in the December 1871 issue.
  • Metaphysical Club meets in Cambridge, Massachusetts

    Metaphysical Club meets in Cambridge, Massachusetts
    A philosophical club formed between Holmes, James, and Pierce in which they pursued critical thinking and pragmaticist ideals.
  • Woman's Christian Temperance Union organized

    Woman's Christian Temperance Union organized
    Founded in 1874, this organization advocated for the prohibition of alcohol, using women's supposedly greater purity and morality as a rallying point. Advocates of prohibition in the United States found common cause with activists elsewhere, especially in Britain, and in the 1880s they founded the World Women's Christian Temperance Union, which sent missionaries around the world to spread the gospel of temperance.
  • Johns Hopkins University graduate school established

    Johns Hopkins University graduate school established
    The university opened in 1876 and maintained the nation's first high-grade graduate school and ably carried on the Germanic tradition of profusely footnoted tomes
  • Mary Eddy establishes Christian Science

    Mary Eddy establishes Christian Science
    She founded the Church of Christ (Christian Science) in 1879. Preached that the true practice of Christianity heals sickness. (No need for a doctor, if have enough faith can heal self). Wrote a widely purchased book, "Science and Health with a key to the Scriptures".
  • American Red Cross founded, Booker T. Washington becomes head of Tuskegee Institute

    American Red Cross founded, Booker T. Washington becomes head of Tuskegee Institute
    Booker Washington felt that african americans should accept segregation and the best way to overcome it is to improve your farming and vocational skills. Clara Barton formed the American Red Cross in the 1880's after being an army nurse.
  • Immigration Act

    Immigration Act
    Banned Chinese immigration into the United States for ten years and barred Chinese already in the country from becoming naturalized citizens. Congress renewed law for another 10 years in 1892 and made it permanent in 1902.
  • Brooklyn Bridge completed

    Brooklyn Bridge completed
    Designed by John Roebling, this structure combines two structural systems: steel cables (tension) and arches themselves (compression). This structure established the basis for all modern suspension bridges; it also showed the first time steel used in an American structure.
  • Mark Twain publishes, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Mark Twain publishes, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
    He was America's most popular author, but also renowned platform lecturer. He lived from 1835 to 1910. Used "romantic" type literature with comedy to entertain his audiences. In 1873 along with the help of Charles Dudley Warner he wrote The Gilded Age. This is why the time period is called the "Gilded Age". The greatest contribution he made to American literature was the way he captured the frontier realism and humor through the dialect his characters use.
  • Louis Sullivan builds the first sky scraper in Chicago

    Louis Sullivan builds the first sky scraper in Chicago
    Sullivan was a Chicago architect and contributed to the development and popularity of skyscrapers.
  • Statue of Liberty erected in NYC harbor

    Statue of Liberty erected in NYC harbor
    The Statue of LIberty was a gift from france and meant as a symbol for being easy with immigrants, although at this time anti-foreign feelings were on the rise.
  • APA formed, Hatch Act supplements Morrill Act

    APA formed, Hatch Act supplements Morrill Act
    The Hatch Act extended the Morrill Act and provided federal funds for the establishment of agricultural experiment stations in connection with the land-grant colleges.
  • Edward Bellamy publishes Looking Backward

    Edward Bellamy publishes Looking Backward
    Looking Backward rivaled Henry George, he wrote Looking Backward, a utopian novel, published in 1888, it described the experiences of a young Bostonian who went into a hypnotic sleep in 1887 and awoke in 2000, finding a new social order in which want, politics and vice were unknown.
  • basketball invented

    basketball invented
    James Naismith invented basketball in 1888.
  • Jane Addams founds Hull House in Chicago

    Jane Addams founds Hull House in Chicago
    The most prominent American settlement house, established in Chicago in 1889 by Jane Addams. It was located in a poor immigrant neighborhood of Greeks, Italians, Russians, and Germans and offered instruction in English, counseling to help newcomers cope with American big-city life, child-care services for working mothers, and cultural activities for neighborhood residents.
  • National American Woman Suffrage Association formed

    National American Woman Suffrage Association formed
    Pro-suffrage organization formed by the joining of the national woman suffrage association and the american woman suffrage association. Organization established in 1890 to promote woman suffrage; stressed that women's special virtue made them indispensable to politics.
  • Anti-Saloon League formed

    Anti-Saloon League formed
    The most successful political action group that forced the prohibition issue into the forefront of state and local elections and pioneered the strategy of the single-issue pressure group.
  • Columbian Expostion held in Chicago

    Columbian Expostion held in Chicago
    It was an exposition held in Chicago in 1893 to honor the four-hundredth anniversary of Columbus's first voyage and the so-called dream of loveliness. It was visited by over 27 million people and raised American artistic standards and promoted city planning. It was a revival of classical architectural forms, and a setback for realism.
  • Library of Congress opens

    Library of Congress opens
    The opening of the Library brought literature into peoples' homes.
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman publishes, Women and Economics

    Charlotte Perkins Gilman publishes, Women and Economics
    Charlotte Perkins Gilman's book urging women to enter the work force and advocating cooperative kitchens and child care centers.
  • Kate Chopin publishes, The Awakening

    Kate Chopin publishes, The Awakening
    Chopin wrote about adultery, suicide, and women's ambitions in The Awakening.
  • Theodore Dreiser publishes, Sister Carrie

    Theodore Dreiser publishes, Sister Carrie
    Sister Carrie told of a woman's escapades in the big city and made cities dazzling and attractive.
  • Henry Adams privately publishes, The Education of Henry Adams

    Henry Adams privately publishes, The Education of Henry Adams
    The autobiography of a member of the presidential Adams family of New England. Adams mingles a partial story of his life with an indictment of his educations and reflections on the fundamental ideas of modern time and of the Middle Ages.
  • NAACP founded

    NAACP founded
    National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, founded in 1909 to work for racial equality.