A Streetcar Named Desire Timeline

Timeline created by Glak
  • Scene 1

    Scene 1
    13 Minutes
    6:00 PM
    Blanche arrives at Elysian Fields at the French Quarter to live with her sister Stella and her husband Stanley. The play introduces some mistique around Blanche's character and hints around the events that led to Blanche arriving at Elysian Fields. Characters in the Scene:
    Blanche, Stella, Stanley, Eunice, Steve, Mitch Monolgue:
    Page 21-22 by Blanche
  • Scene 2

    Scene 2
    11 Minutes
    6:00 PM
    Summary
    Stella and Blanche prepare to leave to experience the New Orleans night life. Stanley rummages through Blanche's belongings and is suspicious of her, accusing her of swindling him of her property. This hints at the future conflicts between Stanley and Blanche. Characters
    Stanley, Blanche, Stella
  • Scene 3: The Poker Night

    Scene 3: The Poker Night
    15 Minutes
    2 AM
    Summary
    Stanley hosts his poker night where Mitch meets Blanche. They banter and Stanley beats Stella who runs from him but ends up returning anyways. Characters:
    Stanley, Stella
  • Scene 4

    Scene 4
    11 Minutes
    9 AM
    Summary
    Blanche confronts Stella the morning after she returns to Stanley and attempts to persuade her to leave Stanley. Stanley overhears but Stella ends up staying, and Stanley tauntingly grins at Blanche, starting their conflict. Characters
    Stella, Blanche, Stanley Monologue
    Page 83
    Pgs 83-84
  • Scene 5

    Scene 5
    11 Minutes
    8 PM
    Summary
    Blanche is confronted by Stanley who tells her that he has heard shady rumours about her from an informant named Shaw. Blanche admits to Stella tthat she wants to marry Mitch and the scene ends with Blanche kissing a young man and meeting Mitch. Characters:
    Stanley, Eunice, Steve, Blanche, Young Man, Mitch
  • Scene 6

    Scene 6
    11 Minutes
    2 AM
    Summary
    Mitch and Blanche return from their date and Blanche is playing hard to get with Mitch. Blanche reveals more about her past and of her dead husband Allan. Mitch then poses a question, "could it be us". Characters
    Mitch, Blanche Monologue:
    114-115
  • Scene 7

    Scene 7
    10 Minutes
    6 PM
    Summary
    Stanley reveals to Stella the "dope" that he had collected on Blanche. He reveals that hshe slept with many men in Laurel and was fired from her job because she slept with a student. He also tells Stella that he told Mitch and that Mitch had "wised up". Characters
    Stella, Stanley, Blanche
  • Scene 8

    Scene 8
    9 Minutes
    7 PM
    Mitch did not show up to Blanche's birthday party and during the awkward dinner Stanley gives Blanche his present, a ticket back to Laurel. The scene ends with Stanley taking Stella to the hospital. Characters:
    Stanley, Blanche, Stella
  • Scene 9

    Scene 9
    9 Minutes
    7:45 PM
    Blanche is alone at home drinking when Mitch enters the house to confront her about her lies. They argue and Mitch tells Blanche that he is through with her and Blanche screams at him causing him to leave the house. During this scene the play reveals a lot about Blanche's past. Characters
    Mitch, Blanche Monologue:
    Pages 146-147
  • Scene 10

    Scene 10
    10 Minutes
    11 PM Blanche is drinking her problems away after Mitch left when Stanley returns from the hospital. While he acts friendly enough Blanche provokes him into becoming aggressive and Stanley begins yelling at her. In the ensuing conflict Stanley ends up raping Blanche. Characters in Scene
    Blanche, Stanley
  • Scene 11

    Scene 11
    11 Minutes
    8 PM
    Several weeks have passed and Blanche's sanity has completely deteriorated, and as a result Stella has arranged for Blanche to go to an asylum. Stella has chosen not to believe Blanche's rape and the scene ends with Blanche being sent away with a doctor. Characters in Scene
    Blanche, Stella, Stanley, Eunice, Mitch, Pablo, Steve, Doctor, Matron Monologue:
    Page 170
  • Timeline Analysis

    A majority of the scenes from the play take place at night, around 6 PM or later.
    The only scene which does not occur at night is scene 4, where Blanche talks with Stella.
    The Varsouviana is constantly heard whenever Blanche reflects on her past or recalls her dead husband Allan.
    Scene 3 is the only scene with a title, which is "Poker Night".
    The intermissions always occur at the beginning of the time skips, such as scenes 4 and 6.
  • Timeline Analysis Part 2

    Scene 3 sets the gender roles for the play, such as Stanley's dominance over Stella and their relationship.
    It also sets up Mitch and Stanley's relationship and the central plot of the play.
    Scenes 7-10 all happen on the same day and they reveal much about Blanche's past and character.
    The intermissions occur at the time skips and the intermissions occur at a point where a revelation is thrown at the audience, keeping them confused and interested and building suspense.
  • Parallels

    There are several parallels in the play.
    Scenes 3 and 5 are similar in that in both scenes a woman leaves her husband but ends up returning, such as Stella leaving Stanley and Eunice leaving Steve.
    In scenes 9 and 10 they are practically the same scenes but with different characters, Mitch and Stanley respectively, and the parallel scenes reveal a lot about their personalities.
  • Parallels Part 2

    When Blanche enters the house in the beginning of the play during the poker night she tells the men to "not get up" and in scene 11 as she leaves she repeats the same lines while they hold their poker session. Blanche does this in order to feel superior and to create for herself a reality in which people are respectful towards her.
    In scene 1 Stanley is seen bringing meat to the household, and later on in Scene 4 Blanche talks about Stanley being a caveman bringing meat from the jungle.
  • Parallels Part 3

    Blanche showers in scene 2 and 7 and it is mentioned she showers a lot. Blanche does this to feel more "refreshed", to feel younger and prettier which is important to her. She is also symbolically ridding herself of the "filth" that she sees in the French Quarter, as well as to feel superior to others and "cleaner" than people her new environment.