2017 Ray Lee Dalat World History

Timeline created by Asassinator(Ray)
In History
  • 12,000 BCE

    3.1: Fertile Crescent: First humans arrive

    3.1: Fertile Crescent: First humans arrive
    The first hunter-gatherer groups settled in Mesopotamia 12,000 years ago.
  • 12,000 BCE

    4.1: Egypt: Hunter Gatherers arrive

    4.1: Egypt: Hunter Gatherers arrive
    Ancient hunter gatherers, like the ones from Mesopotamia, moved to the Nile Valley around 12,000 years ago. They learned how to farm and made small villages. It was also they who formed the Lower and Upper Egypt.
  • 7,000 BCE

    3.1: Mesopotamia: Hunter gatherers FARM

    3.1: Mesopotamia: Hunter gatherers FARM
    Around 7,000 BC, the hunter gatherers use silt from the floods to farm crops.
  • 7,000 BCE

    6.1: First civilizations begin in the Huang He

    6.1: First civilizations begin in the Huang He
    Almost all ancient civilizations began along rivers. China is no exception, for they're civilization starts in the Huang He river, meaning Yellow River. They started farming along the river, because of the silt deposits.
  • 3,500 BCE

    3.2: Mesopotamia-First city

    3.2: Mesopotamia-First city
    Due to food surpluses and division of labor, cities were made as a place for trading. Cities also provided leaders. One of the more known cities was Sumer.
  • 3,100 BCE

    4.1: Egypt: Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt

    4.1: Egypt: Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt
    A century after Upper and Lower Egypt were formed, a man called Menes became leader of Upper, his goal now is to finish what the previous king, Scorpion failed to do: unify both parts of Egypt. Menes succeeded in doing so when he attacked Lower Egypt. He was the first pharoh of Egypt and wore the double crown.
  • 2,700 BCE

    4.2: Rise Of The Old Kingdom

    4.2: Rise Of The Old Kingdom
    As the Third Dynasty rose to power, so came the Old Kingdom. It lasted for around 5 centuries. It lasted from approximately 2700BC to 2200BC.
  • 2,300 BCE

    5.1: India: Harappan Civilization

    5.1: India: Harappan Civilization
    The Harappan Civilization was the first civilization to thrive. It was named after the modern day Harrapa, the city where it's ruins were found. The greatest sources of this civilization are the remains of it's to greatest cities, Harrapa and Monhenjo Daro.
  • 2,000 BCE

    3.3: Mesopotamia: The Epic of Gilgamesh was written

    3.3: Mesopotamia: The Epic of Gilgamesh was written
    The Epic Of Gilgamesh is currently the oldest epic in the world. It was carved in stone tablets, and the actual Gilgamesh, king of the city Uruk, lived 700 years before the epic.
  • 2,000 BCE

    5.1: India: Aryan's arrival

    5.1: India: Aryan's arrival
    After the collapse of the Harrapan civilization, the Aryans came in from the North and became the dominant group in India for that time.
  • 1,800 BCE

    3.4: Babylon: Rise of the Babylonians

    3.4: Babylon: Rise of the Babylonians
    After Ur was destroyed in 2000BC, the Babylonians took over by 1800BC. Their ruler was Hammurabi, who was the cities greatest monarch.
  • 1,595 BCE

    3.4: Asia Minor: Development of the chariot

    3.4: Asia Minor: Development of the chariot
    The Hitties master ironworking and therefore were able to create wheels and, soon after, chariots. It allowed Hittite soldiers to move quickly in battle. After this, they used the chariots to take over Babylon.
  • 1,550 BCE

    4.3: The New Kingdom of Egypt

    4.3: The New Kingdom of Egypt
    The New Kingdom brought a whole new world of trade. It was also the longest lasting kingdom: it had been around for 500 years! It was ruled by many pharaohs, but the most famous one is Queen Hatshepsut.
  • 1,400 BCE

    5.2: India: Sikhism founded

    5.2: India: Sikhism founded
    Sikhism was formed centuries after Jainism. Founded by Guru (teacher in Sanskrit) Nanak, Sikhism is monotheistic. Nanak was raised Hindu but didn't the way they did things, so he travelled to many places and got in contact with many religions, including Islam.
  • 1,200 BCE

    6.1: China: Bones and shells are used for Chinese writing

    6.1: China: Bones and shells are used for Chinese writing
    Chinese writing, although gone through many changes, originated from the Shang Dynasty. Ancient priests used to write on cattle bones and turtle shells. This was because they thought that by "reading" the cracks they could predict the future! These bones were then called oracle bones.
  • -900 BCE

    8.1: Greece: The Classical Age begins.

    8.1: Greece: The Classical Age begins.
    This Classical Age occurs 300 years after the fall of Mycenae. This era brought in city-states when some Greeks banded together for protection. This is also the time when Acropolises, city-states on mountains.
  • -751 BCE

    4.5: Kush: Kush's Conquest of Egypt

    4.5: Kush: Kush's Conquest of Egypt
    After being driven away by the Kushites the first time they invaded it, Egypt was very weak. That led to the Kushites capturing Upper Egypt.
  • -600 BCE

    8.3: Athens: Aesop's Fables were written

    8.3: Athens: Aesop's Fables were written
    Although it is unclear, Aesop supposedly started writing these fables during the mid-to-late 6th century BC. There are 725 fables, most having a moral to teach the reader.
  • -551 BCE

    6.2: China: Confucius was born

    6.2: China: Confucius was born
    Confucius was the inventor of the widely known philosophy called Confucianism. He is the most influential teacher in Chinese history!
  • -550 BCE

    9.1: Persian Empire: Cyrus takes control

    9.1: Persian Empire: Cyrus takes control
    In 700BC, a people called Medes ruled over the Persians. 150 years later, a man named Cyrus led a revolt against the Medes, they won and now Cyrus was the leader of the Persian Empire.
  • -535 BCE

    5.3: India: The Great Departure

    5.3: India: The Great Departure
    As Prince Siddhartha Gautama turns 30, he left his home to find answers for his question of life. He went to great distances to find the answers, asking priests and people known for their wisdom, but he didn't find any. Not yet, at least.
  • -500 BCE

    8.2: Athens: Democracy

    8.2: Athens: Democracy
    Nearing the end of tyranny, a man named Cleisthenes was ruler. He didn't want aristocrats to rule, so with the influence of the people, he overthrew the aristocracy. And by doing that, democracy was born. Cleisthenes is often called the father of democracy.
  • -481 BCE

    6.2: China: The beginning of the Warring States Period

    6.2: China: The beginning of the Warring States Period
    When invaders came to attack the Zhou and succeeded, the lords began to fight each other for power. The Warring States period began like this. They were a bunch of Civil Wars happening, sons were killing fathers, fathers were killing sons, it was chaos.
  • -458 BCE

    10.1: Rome: Cincinnatus takes power

    10.1: Rome: Cincinnatus takes power
    Although he started as a farmer, Cincinnatus, the famous early Roman Republic dictator (what a long description), took control of Rome to defend it from the city’s enemies. After that, he resigned almost immediately and people admired him for that.
  • -450 BCE

    10.2: Rome: The 12 Tables were written

    10.2: Rome: The 12 Tables were written
    During Rome’s Republican years, they needed a way to keep order because laws that weren’t written down were hard to remember, so Roman officials made the 12 Tables, a set of rules that were displayed in the Forum, Rome’s public meeting place.
  • -404 BCE

    9.2: Athens: End of the Peloponnesian War

    9.2: Athens: End of the Peloponnesian War
    The Delian League (Athens) and the Peloponnesian League (Sparta) fought each other for 3 decades, but in the end, Sparta defeated the Athenians because they had destroyed their food supply and left Athens starving.
  • -399 BCE

    9.4: Greece: The death of Socrates

    9.4: Greece: The death of Socrates
    Socrates (a.k.a the teacher of the teacher of the teacher of Alexander the Great) was a philosopher who wanted people to question their beliefs. He taught by asking questions. Many people didn't the idea of questioning their beliefs, so Socrates was condemned to death via drinking poison. He did this while his students watched.
  • -336 BCE

    9.3: Macedonia: Alexander takes the throne

    9.3: Macedonia: Alexander takes the throne
    Alexander the Great was Philip II's son. After the city of Thebes attempted to rebel, he annihilated them. This had started his conquest to capture more parts of Asia to add into his kingdom, including the Persian Empire.
  • -265 BCE

    5.4: India-Asoka converts to Buddhism

    5.4: India-Asoka converts to Buddhism
    After watching and fighting with his soldiers, Asoka, Candragupta's son, was traumatized. So after a few years into his reign, Asia turned to Buddhism and swore to never launch an attack ever again.
  • -221 BCE

    6.3: China: Shi Huangdi unified China

    6.3: China: Shi Huangdi unified China
    Shi Huagdi, also known as Ying Zheng, was the first ruler of the entirety of China. His name also stands for "first emperor". Shi Huangdi followed Legalistic beliefs to keep the new China under control.
  • -202 BCE

    10.3: Carthage: The Battle of Zama

    10.3: Carthage: The Battle of Zama
    During Hannibal’s attack on Italy, a Roman General, Scipio Africanus, led an army to Attack Carthage itself. This led Hannibal to fall back to Carthage and attempt to defeat Scipio. When they reached Zama,they were defeated by Scipio.
  • -31 BCE

    11.1: Egypt: Marc Anthony and Cleopatra dies

    11.1: Egypt: Marc Anthony and Cleopatra dies
    After his fleet being defeated by Octavian, Marc Anthony and his wife Cleopatra return to Egypt and take their lives there so that they won’t be taken prisoners by Octavian.
  • 30

    11.2: Rome: Jesus Crucified

    11.2: Rome: Jesus Crucified
    After Jesus got too much attention, the Romans didn't like him that much, and because of this, he was arrested, and sentenced to death via crucifixion. This was basically the beginning of the spread of Christianity.
  • 64

    6.2: Rome: Nero bans Christianity

    6.2: Rome: Nero bans Christianity
    When Christianity started to spread in Rome, Nero, the Emperor at that time, thought of this as a political problem. Because of this, he started persecuting Christians in groups, and this went on for several years until Constantine showed up and stopped it.
  • 105

    6.4: China: The invention of paper

    6.4: China: The invention of paper
    Cai Lun, born in 48AD, was the profound inventor of paper, something that everybody uses to write, scribble, draw, etc. The oldest appear book found was dated back to 256 AD. This type of paper is not to be mistaken with papyrus from Egypt, which came before this type of paper.
  • 200

    6.5: China: The Arrival of Buddhism

    6.5: China: The Arrival of Buddhism
    During the decline of the Han Dynasty (due to people ignoring laws and lots of violence), Buddhism was spreading from India to many places trading goods. While the decline was happening, Buddhism saved the day with their idea of an end to suffering.
  • 300

    11.3: The Byzantine Empire

    11.3: The Byzantine Empire
    After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, The Eastern side adapted to Greek Cultures and became the Byzantine Empire, named after the land that Constantinople was built on.
  • 490

    5.5: India-Panchatantra was produced

    5.5: India-Panchatantra was produced
    Before 500AD, near the end of Ancient India, a group of Indian writers produced a book called Panchatantra. This book of stories was all about teaching lessons. They praise people of cleverness and quick thinking. Each story has a message about things like winning friends wagaing wars, or some other idea. Kind of like Aesop's Fables.
  • 570

    12.1: Mecca: Muhammad the Prophet is born

    12.1: Mecca: Muhammad the Prophet is born
    Before the Islamic religion, Arabians were polytheistic. That changed when Muhammad was born. He was the prophet for Allah, which means “the God”, who told Muhammad that he was the only God. This led to monotheistic religion called Islam.
  • 632

    12.2: Mecca: The Qur’an

    12.2: Mecca: The Qur’an
    The Qur’an is the holy book of Islam. It consists mostly of Muhammad's teachings and was formed after Muhammad’s death. This book also talks about there being only one God, Allah, and that Muhammad is his prophet.
  • 1325

    12.4: Morocco: Ibn Battutah

    12.4: Morocco: Ibn Battutah
    Ibn Battutah is considered one of the world’s greatest traveler. For around 30 years, Battutah has seen most of the Islamic world, North Africa and almost all of ASIA!!!
  • 1520

    12.3: Ottoman Empire: Mehmed II

    12.3: Ottoman Empire: Mehmed II
    The Ottoman Empire started off with Mehmed II, also known as “the Conqueror”. Mehmed did a lot of things, two of which are the Janissaries and the conquering of the Byzantine Empire. Janissaries were Christian boys that were converted to soldiers, and Mehmed II defeated the Byzantine Empire, putting an end to the Roman Empire.
  • 8.3: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Olympics

    8.3: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Olympics
    One of the ways the Greeks honored the gods was to hold an event every four years in Olympia. They use to do simple things like running, but now we have a lot more types of sports to do. The first modern Olympics event was held in Athens in 1896.
  • 4.4: Egypt: MODERN DAY EVENT: Paper and writing.

    4.4: Egypt: MODERN DAY EVENT: Paper and writing.
    The modern paper we use today we're inspired by Egypt's papyrus. They used it to write scrolls and hieroglyphics.
  • 3.4: Phoenicia: MODERN DAY EVENT: The early alphabet

    3.4: Phoenicia: MODERN DAY EVENT: The early alphabet
    Thanks to the Phoenicians, we can use the alphabets that I'm using now. These letters originated from the idea of recording their trading activities.
  • 5.2: India: MODERN DAY EVENT: Nonviolence

    5.2: India: MODERN DAY EVENT: Nonviolence
    The Jains (Jainism people) practiced nonviolence, the avoidance of violent actions. Last Sunday, a few people held up flags of peace to stop American wars in Napa. The signs would write things such as "NO JUSTICE-KNOW PEACE" and "NONVIOLENCE OR NON-EXISTENCE"
  • 6.4: China: MODERN DAY EVENT: the seismograph

    6.4: China: MODERN DAY EVENT: the seismograph
    During the Han Dynasty, a man called Zhang Heng invented the seismograph - the first way to record an earthquake. It had saved countless lives, and it's appearance has changed during the years. During the 6th of October, seismograph readings detected a dramatic increase in seismic activity at the Bali volcano in Indonesia.
  • 9.4: Greece: MODERN DAY EVENT: Geometry

    9.4: Greece: MODERN DAY EVENT: Geometry
    Euclid lived at around 300BC. He is now known as the Father Of Geometry. He has wrote about the relationship between mathematics and other fields, such as astronomy and music. Many rules in geometry were there because of Euclid.
  • 10.2: Rome: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Republic

    10.2: Rome: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Republic
    The government type called the Republic started in Rome. It was one of Rome’s greatest strengths. Because of this, other countries are also Republic countries such as: U.S.A, China, Russia, etc.
  • 11.2: Rome: MODERN DAY EVENT: Christianity

    11.2: Rome: MODERN DAY EVENT: Christianity
    Christianity is one of the most famous religions in the whole world. Christianity actually started as a denomination of Judaism, the original religion that talked about the Laws of Moses and the coming of the Messiah. The New Testament talks about the life of Jesus: his teaching's, his death and resurrection. It also talks about Paul of Tarsus' letters (epistles) to parts of the Roman Empire. Christianity has been spread across the world because of Jesus, God's anointed one: the Messiah.
  • 12.2: Mecca: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Five Pillars Of Islam

    12.2: Mecca: MODERN DAY EVENT: The Five Pillars Of Islam
    The Five Pillars Of Islam are five acts of worship required by Muslims. Each pillar has a different meaning that is listed here.
    1) Must state their faith by saying, “There is no God but God, and Muhammad is his prophet.”
    2) Muslims must pray 5 times a day
    3) Muslims donate 2.5% of their wealth to the poor and needy
    4) Muslims must fast for around a month
    5) Muslims must travel to Mecca at least once
  • Period:
    10,000 BCE
    to
    -500 BCE

    Chapter 3: Early Fertile Crescent People

    The groups that had lived in the Fertile Crescent are: Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Hittites, Kassites, Assyrians, Chaldeans, ant the Phoenicians
  • Period:
    3,200 BCE
    to
    400

    Chapter 4: Ancient Egypt & Kush

    Old Kingdom: 2700BC to 2200BC
    Middle Kingdom: 2050BC to 1750BC
    New Kingdom: 1550BC to 1050 BC
    Egytian rule over Kush: 1550BC to 1100BC
    Kushite rule over Egypt: 751BC to 670sBC
    End of Kush: 300sAD
  • Period:
    2,600 BCE
    to
    -500 BCE

    Chapter 8: Ancient Greece

    Mycenaeans: 1600-1100BC
    Minoans: 2600-1100BC
    Dark Ages: 1100-800BC
    Oligarchy rule: 600-546BC
    Tyranny rule: 546-500BC
    Democracy rule: 500-???
  • Period:
    2,300 BCE
    to
    500

    Chapter 4: Ancient India

    Harrapan civilization: 2300BC to 1700BC
    Aryan society: 1500BC to 320BC
    Founding of Buddhism: 528BC
    Mauryan Empire: 320BC to 185BC
    Gupta Empire: 320AD to 500AD
  • Period:
    1,600 BCE
    to
    220

    Chapter 6: Ancient China

    Xia Dynasty: 2200BC to ???
    Shang Dynasty: 1500BC to 1050BC
    Zhou Dyanasty: 1100BC to 400BC (longest dynasty)
    Qin Dynasty: 221BC-206BC
    Han Dynasty: 206BC-220AD
  • Period:
    -753 BCE
    to
    -23 BCE

    Chapter 10: The Roman Republic

    Founding of Rome (According to legend): 753BC
    Etruscans take over Rome: 600BC
    Roman Republic: 509BC
    Punic Wars: 246-146BC
  • Period:
    -550 BCE
    to
    30

    Chapter 9: The Greek World

    Persian Empire (From Cyrus to Alexander: 550BC-330BC
    The Persian Wars: 490BC-449BC
    Peloponnesian War: 431BC-404BC
    Alexander The Great's life: 356BC-323BC
  • Period:
    -50 BCE
    to
    1453

    Chapter 11: Rome and Christianity

    Caesar’s rule: 45 BC to 50 BC
    Beginning of Empire: 27 BC
    Life of Jesus: 1 AD to 30 AD
    Christianity becomes sole religion: 300s AD
    Split of Roman Empire: 395 AD
    End of Western Roman Empire: 476 AD
    Fall of Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantine Empire): 1453 AD
  • Period:
    550
    to

    Chapter 12: The Islamic World

    Muhammad: 570-632
    Ottoman Empire: 1299-present day
    Safavid Empire: 1501-1700s
    Mughal Empire:1500s-1600s