1914-1929

Timeline created by BobertBobsonBob
In History
  • Joining the First World War

    Joining the First World War
    The first world war was a war we were obligated to go into, however, we joined using an autonomous declaration.
  • Military Service Act of 1917 - Forced Conscription (-2)

    Military Service Act of 1917 - Forced Conscription (-2)
    After recruitment into the army diminished, Robert Borden won an election to make forced conscription possible. Due to removing voting rights for some and adding them for others, Borden won election as well as convincing much of English Canada that everyone had to "do their bit", He was able to make forced conscription a reality.
  • Enemy Aliens (-2)

    Enemy Aliens (-2)
    Due to the propaganda that happened in Canada, people originating from the enemy countries were demonized and dubbed "enemy aliens." Their right to vote was removed, and some were sent to internment camps where they did hard labour.
  • Workers After the War (+1.25)

    Workers After the War (+1.25)
    After the war, there were poor wages and the economy was not in good shape. While it turned around eventually, it lead to unionization and future wage negotiations and laws.
  • Greater Canadian Identity After the War (+1.75)

    Greater Canadian Identity After the War (+1.75)
    After the war, Canada was recognized as a higher status within the British Empire (Eventually to become the Commonwealth), and had grown as a country.
  • Chinese Immigration Act / Exclusion Act (-2)

    Chinese Immigration Act / Exclusion Act (-2)
    Immigration of the Chinese was excluded, so that Canada could "eliminate the yellow peril."
  • First Nations After the War (-2)

    First Nations After the War (-2)
    After the war, the Indian Act was amended in 1927. Along with this, their children were taken away from their homes and sent to residential schools where they suffered.
  • Persons Act (+1.75)

    Persons Act (+1.75)
    The persons act was an act that gave greater liberty to the Women of Canada, where they were legally considered "persons" and could hold government office.