1776-1861 Timeline (American Revolution-Civil War)

Timeline created by A_Conte
In History
  • Declaring Independance

    Declaring Independance
    The signing of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. This officialy declared independance from Britain. "Signing of the Declaration of Independence." Image. Corel. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 9 Jan. 2014.
  • Articles of Confederation

    Articles of Confederation
    The Second Continental Congress began the challenge of forming a functioning government, and after a year of struggle and disagreements the Articles of Confederation were adopted in 1781. The articles provided a limited central government that proved ineffective, leading to the Constitutional Convention in 1787. "First page of the Articles of Confederation." Image. National Archives. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 9 Jan. 2014.
  • U.S. Constitution Adoped

    U.S. Constitution Adoped
    The United States Constitution was adopted September 17, 1787 following the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania "First page of the Constitution." Image. National Archives. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 9 Jan. 2014.
  • First President

    First President
    George Washington takes the oath during his inauguration as the first president of the United States, in 1789. "George Washington takes oath during his presidential inauguration." Image. Chaiba Media. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 9 Jan. 2014.
  • The Cotton Gin

    The Cotton Gin
    "Patent drawing of a cotton gin." Image. National Archives. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 9 Jan. 2014. The institution of slavery in the United States changed dramatically with the invention of the cotton gin in 1793. When Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin, cotton became an extremely lucrative crop, and the labor-saving machine actually increased the demand for slaves to harvest more and more cotton.
  • Political Parties Develope

    Political Parties Develope
    "Development of Political Parties, 1789-1800 (Visual)." American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 9 Jan. 2014.
  • Slavery Rises

    Slavery Rises
    Given the agricultural demands, most enslaved Africans of the 1800s worked in the plantation fields. Their days were long—dawn to dusk—and they faced intolerable living conditions. "Slavery Again, 1800-1830 (Visual)." American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 9 Jan. 2014.
  • The Luisiana Purchase

    The Luisiana Purchase
    Signing of the Louisiana Purchase in New Orleans, 1803. "Signing of the Louisiana Purchase." Image. Architect of the Capitol. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 9 Jan. 2014.
  • War of 1812

    War of 1812
    Britain seized cargoes and ordered the impressment of American sailors. In 1810, Madison once again stopped trade with Britain. Two years later, Britain finally agreed to respect the neutrality of U.S. ships. Unfortunately, no one in the United States heard about the change until after Madison declared war. "War of 1812 (Visual)." American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 9 Jan. 2014.
  • America Begins to Industrialize

    America Begins to Industrialize
    Young women operating power looms in Lowell, Massachusetts "Power loom." Image. North Wind Picture Archives. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 9 Jan. 2014.
  • Monroe Doctrine

    Monroe Doctrine
    President James Monroe (left) and members of his cabinet discuss the Monroe Doctrine issued in 1823. The policy was designed to deter European countries from future colonization in the Western Hemisphere. "James Monroe and cabinet discuss Monroe Doctrine." Image. Office of the Curator, Architect of the Capitol. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 9 Jan. 2014.
  • Age of The Common Man

    Age of The Common Man
    Andrew Jackson left a political legacy known as Jacksonian Democracy that encompassed a new political party and a new interpretation of the role of the president. "Andrew Jackson." Image. Library of Congress. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 9 Jan. 2014.
  • War with Mexico

    War with Mexico
    The cause or causes of the Mexican-American War are still a matter of historical dispute. Many maintain that Mexico began the war because the U.S. government approved the annexation of Texas, even though Texas had declared its independence from Mexico 10 years earlier in 1836. Others argue that the United States provoked the war by stationing armed troops at the mouth of the Rio Grande River. "Battle of Buena Vista." Image. Library of Congress. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 12 Jan. 2014
  • Sectionalism

    Sectionalism
    In the first half of the 19th century, the United States and its people found themselves evolving in two very different directions. That division generally reflected the geographic regions of the North and the South. As a result of their varied geography, those two regions had developed vastly contrasting economic, social, and cultural features. "Sectionalism, 1840-1861 (Visual).
    " American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 12 Jan. 2014.
  • Abolition of Slavery

    Abolition of Slavery
    "Abolition (Visual)." American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 12 Jan. 2014.
  • Compromise

    Compromise
    Despite a series of compromises, the issue of slavery was becoming more and more unmanageable. As a result of the Missouri Compromise (1820), Congress had drawn an imaginary line across the United States that reached from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean. Any new territory north of that imaginary line that became part of the Union would do so as a free state. "Henry Clay debates the Compromise of 1850." Image. North Wind Picture Archives. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 12 Jan.2014
  • Election of 1860

    Election of 1860
    Abraham Lincoln, known as the Great Emancipator for his role in freeing the slaves, is perhaps the most revered U.S. president. "Abraham Lincoln." Image. Library of Congress. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 12 Jan. 2014.
  • The Civil War Begins

    The Civil War Begins
    The Civil War erupted as a result of intense economic, social, and political differences that had mounted over four decades between the North and the South. "Fall of Fort Henry." Image. Library of Congress. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 12 Jan. 2014.
  • Period: to

    1776-1861